ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Turmoil in Kyrgyzstan: Power Play of Vested Interests

Ethnic and economic disparities between the Kyrgyz and Uzbek may have contributed to the recent clashes in southern Kyrgyzstan. However, a campaign by former president Kurmanbek Bakiyev and his supporters to destabilise the government of Roza Otunbayeva cannot be ruled out. The reluctance of Russia and the United States to intervene further complicated the situation. The interim government created history by bringing about constitutional reforms through a referendum, but problems remain.

COMMENTARY

Turmoil in Kyrgyzstan:

witnessed hostilities. In April 2010, about 80 people were killed during protests

Power Play of Vested Interests

against the former Bakiyev government. Prior to that, in March 2005, during the

 

Tulip Revolution, fighting brought Bakiyev

 

of Jalal-Abad to power, forcing his prede-

R G Gidadhubli

cessor Aksar Akayev to flee the country

Ethnic and economic disparities between the Kyrgyz and Uzbek may have contributed to the recent clashes in southern Kyrgyzstan. However, a campaign by former president Kurmanbek Bakiyev and his supporters to destabilise the government of Roza Otunbayeva cannot be ruled out. The reluctance of Russia and the United States to intervene further complicated the situation. The interim government created history by bringing about constitutional reforms through a referendum, but problems remain.

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