ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

A+| A| A-

Caste and Ownership of Private Enterprises

Age-old restrictions on access to capital by certain social groups continue to reflect themselves in the scheduled caste and scheduled tribes owning far fewer private enterprises than warranted by their share in the population in both rurual and urban India. Recent nationwide data also reveal that when they do run business establishments these are mainly household enterprises organised around family labour. Poverty rates among the enterprises of the socially disadvantaged groups are also much higher than among the other castes.

- --   -   - - - - - - -     - -     - -       -       were 29.4%, 26.3% 40.3% and 38.6%, r espectively, indicating a signicantly lower share of SC and ST in ownership of private capital. In recognition of this feature of social ownership of private capital, governments have over the years initiated several meas

Age-old restrictions on access to capital by certain social groups continue to reect themselves in the scheduled caste and scheduled tribes owning far fewer private enterprises than warranted by their share in the population in both rurual and urban India. Recent nationwide data also reveal that when they do run business establishments these are mainly household enterprises organised around family labour. Poverty rates among the enterprises of the socially disadvantaged groups are also much higher than among the other castes. I nter-caste disparity in access to private enterprise has been an important feature of social ownership of private capital in India. The customary restrictions in the past on lower castes entitlement of property rights have led to limited ownership of private enterprise by them. Except the so-called impure and polluting economic activities (like those related to leather, sanitary products and others), the former untouchables were not entitled to undertake business and/or production a ctivities (Olivelle 2005). The restrictions on the ownership of property rights in the past had resulted in a large proportion of low caste persons remaining without c apital assets.

Dear Reader,

To continue reading, become a subscriber.

Explore our attractive subscription offers.

Click here

Or

To gain instant access to this article (download).


Pay
INR 59

(Readers in India)


Pay
$ 6

(Readers outside India)

Support Us

Your Support will ensure EPW’s financial viability and sustainability.

The EPW produces independent and public-spirited scholarship and analyses of contemporary affairs every week. EPW is one of the few publications that keep alive the spirit of intellectual inquiry in the Indian media.

Often described as a publication with a “social conscience,” EPW has never shied away from taking strong editorial positions. Our publication is free from political pressure, or commercial interests. Our editorial independence is our pride.

We rely on your support to continue the endeavour of highlighting the challenges faced by the disadvantaged, writings from the margins, and scholarship on the most pertinent issues that concern contemporary Indian society.

Every contribution is valuable for our future.