ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Sixty Years On

Despite the fanfare around the growing people-to-people contact between the two countries, the political establishments in both India and Pakistan still hold on to the very ideologies that form the basis of the conflict. Any move to normalise relations crucially depends on examining these ideologies and generating strong pressure groups in both countries.

I t is stating the obvious that the Indian and Pakistani polities are indelibly coloured by the Partition of the subcontinent. If nothing else, the immensely destructive conflict between the two states is testament to this fact. In recent times, there has been much fanfare over the growing people-to-people contact between the two neighbours and a sense that the winds of change are blowing over the region. Yet, it cannot be reiterated enough that both the Indian and Pakistani states still cling to ideologies that have been the very basis of the conflict over the past 60 years. Indeed, in an environment of relative optimism, it is essential to remember that establishments on both sides still have a lot to lose from normalisation. Pakistans ruling state oligarchy in particular has relied entirely on the India syndrome to maintain its rigid grip over power.

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