ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Politics : Miles to Go

Miles to Go S Nanjundan writes: Not yet six months in office, the NDA coalition has disap pointed the large number of its well-wishers. Prime minister Vajpayeeji as the most popular politician in the country has failed to rise to his potential as leader of the country. The Gujarat RSS affair and the immature rush to form the Bihar government have been fiascoes. The handling of president Clinton

Not yet six months in office, the NDA coalition has disappointed the large number of its well-wishers. Prime minister Vajpayeeji as the most popular politician in the country has failed to rise to his potential as leader of the country. The Gujarat RSS affair and the immature rush to form the Bihar government have been fiascoes. The handling of president Clinton's visit has till now given much of the advantage to the US and to Pakistan.

The country expects Vajpayee to function as the NDA prime minister and not as the BJP party leader, despite the BJP being the dominant constituent of the NDA. The BJP has to forget about any agenda other than the agreed NDA common programme, if it wants good governance leading to rapid growth and poverty eradication. The political realities today point to a decline of all-India parties including the Congress, BJP and the Communist parties. The next elections in West Bengal and Kerala may well see a considerable erosion of the leftist hold. Countrywide there may well be a further polarisation between the dalits and the OBCs. The former have begun to regard the latter as the new brahmins. The NDA may come to be regarded as a chaturvarna coalition, with only marginal OBC and dalit support. That has been clearly seen in Bihar.

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