ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Crisis in Malaysian Indian Congress

Crisis in Malaysian Indian Congress

M G G Pillai The Indian community in Malaysia is facing a crisis of confidence today because of the corruption charges levelled against the long- time president of the Malaysian Indian Congress MALAYSIA'S Indian community, descended mostly from indentured menial labour the British administration brought in from India for the rubber estates, the railways, hospitals, and public services, from about 10 per cent of its 18 million people and are consigned to the bottom of the social and economic scale: They came from what is now Tamil Nadu, in India, have had few prospects for improvement, continue to live trapped in a vicious circle of frustration, hopelessness, impoverishment. These people constitute about 85 per cent of the Indians in Malaysia, their conditions little better than that of their fathers and grandfathers, who came here as indentured labour. The rest are sons of middle-class educated migrants, of those who escaped from the poverty and impoverishment of the gutter. It is they who provide the leadership in politics, the professions, and of the Malaysian Indian Congress (MIC), a partner in the ruling National Front coalition led by Mahathir Mohamed, the prime minister, and his New United Malays National Organisation (UMNO Baru or New UMNO).

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