ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846
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Weber on Hinduism

Independence India and the political consequences it led to. He tabulates the comparative assets of various industrial houses from 1972 to 1981 to show how private capital accumulation has taken place and with what political repercussions. He points out, "An understanding of the relative strength of the urban and rural bourgeois class, their class unity and mutual relationship and the role of foreign capital in Indian economy will be of great help in grasping the specific character of the Indian state. It should, however, be mentioned that the Indian state has been performing a decisive role in the alignment and realignment of these classes!' Shakir has not, regrettably, dealt with the role of multi-nationals in Indian politics which is certainly of no mean dimension today, It is, in my view, increasing both in depth and breadth. The role of multi-nationals has considerably increased since Rajiv Gandhi took over and certainly needs to be looked into carefully to understand the emerging trends in Indian politics, Moin Shakir also maintains that "the state in India has not developed to the point of autonomy and is not the state of all the classes or people. It is the state which serves the interests of the propertied classes in society". While this assertion is by and large true, there is more to it than has been asserted by the author. The state, it must be understood, as long as its character is democratic, does develop a limited degree of autonomy. Again it is necessary to understand this phenomenon in all its complexity. The popular pressures in a democratic political set up like that of India do affect the policy of the state, These pressures cannot be completely ignored. This is reflected in various land and labour legislations. However, it does not mean that the state can wrench itself free from the clutches of big capitalist-landlord interests. Far from it.

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