ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846
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MEDICAL EDUCATION- Sound and Fury Signifying Nothing

'"THE huge task that faces us could never be solved on a routine or bureaucratic basis, Thus the cornerstone of the scheme we recommend is a Health Worker. The Health Worker will be one of the villagers themselves, only somewhat better trained than themselves. He will not appear to the villagers as a strange imposition of a strange system, but their kith and kin who desires to help them. These Health Workers should be given elementary training in practical, community and personal hygiene, first aid, and simple medical treatment, stress being laid on social aspects and implications of montical and public health work." The above quotation could have been taken from the latest, super- radical, report on health services in India, recently accepted by the Government, called "Health Services and Medical Education". In fact, it comes from the Report of the National Health Sub-Committee of the National Planning Committee of the Congress Party, set up in 1938. In the intervening period the language has become more sophisticated, but the basic message remains the same : health services make their major contribution to health if they concentrate on preventive and public health work, and such work is best carried out by people who are close to the villager, both geographically and socially. This viewpoint has received tost no consideration in the imple- mentation of health services so far : what chance is there that it will in the future?

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