ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846
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Review of Management November 1968 the reaction of the target audience and the final results could have been quite different. Media-wise the exclusion of film in this intra-media comparison appears somewhat surprising. The authors incidentally inform us that as many as 74 per cent in all six villages combined were found not to have seen any films. This may be largely became of the distance or accessibility factor. Dermanent cinemas being all situated THIS work is a largely unrevised memorandum submitted to the Education Commission which received evidence from 1964 to 1966. The memorandum was submitted in January 1966 and its value as a guide to India's educational future has been destroyed in a maelstrom of disastrous events; the devaluation of July 1966, the second successive poor monsoon and harvest in 1966-67 and, finally, the sharp fall in availability of non-project aid since the end of 1967, which is now likely to continue throughout the period of the revised Fourth Plan (1969-1974). The underlying assumptions of the education and manpower projections were based on the overall growth rates calculated in "Notes on Perspective of Development, India 1960-61 to 1975-76" and Pitambar Pant's 1965 revision and extension of these figures to 1986 in his Kale Memorial Lectures "Three Decades of Transition, India 1956-1986", Throughout the volume one searches in vain for the suggestion that the authors thought of testing the sensitivity of their assumptions to different overall growth rates (i e, 5 per cent 5.5 per cent, and 6.0 per cent a year). Did they really think in the autumn of 1965 that 6.6 per cent a year was the most likely growth rate for the Indian economy between 1960-61 and 1975-76? It is also disturbing that there is no justification at all of the choice of 20 years as the projection time period. The uncertainty of long-term planning in developing economies might have influenced the authors to limit their projection to 10 or 15 years. The authors do concede that "Estimates of economic growth over long periods are in the main town, But in the experience of commercial houses who have either used touring talkies or gone into village interiors with mobile vans, the film with its vivid combination of sound and sight has proved to be an extremely effective medium of communication, breaking as it does the barriers of literacy and language, of old habits and attitudes. In a serious painstaking study such as the authors have under- necessarily tentative, and it is hard to judge their implications for employment". In the event, all speculation concerning the empirical value of the projections has ceased a mere two and a half years after the memorandum was submitted. The Indian economy is extremely unlikely to grow at 6.6 per cent a year from 1960-61 to 1975-76 even if a persistent agricultural miracle manifests itself.

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