ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

A+| A| A-

A Date with Sine Die

At this writing, September 4, all trucks, lorries and threewheelers are off the streets in all West Bengal. Transport operators, who are in many ways less taxed here than in most States, are on strike; and the small segment of trade in West Bengal which is still controlled by Bengalis is the hardest hit in consequence.

At this writing, September 4, all trucks, lorries and threewheelers are off the streets in all West Bengal. Transport operators, who are in many ways less taxed here than in most States, are on strike; and the small segment of trade in West Bengal which is still controlled by Bengalis is the hardest hit in consequence. The Pujas, bengal's biggest festival, which of course has considerable commercial implications, are only a few weeks away. This was the time to stock up saris, dhotis, wireless sets and various other things, for the Pujas have set a pattern of buying and selling which hard times can alter but little. Fish, meat and vegetables are getting scarce in Calcutta, for they cannot come from the suburbs and other sources. It is strikes like this that suddenly remind residents of this city how parlously close life is to a standstill; a few transport operators can decide what we will or will not eat.

But this transport deadlock is only a very small part of the wider and deeper goslow that is life in Bengal today. Elected gentry set the pace. The Corporation few take seriously. For months now teachers and students have been out on the streets for one reason or another. One can hardly remember a day on which there are not processions or protest meetings. If it is not the goldsmiths, it is the motion picture employees. If it is not a hartal, it is a bandh. And on Friday (September 2) noise in the West Bengal Legislative Assembly reached a point at which the Speaker could only adjourn the House sine die.

Dear Reader,

To continue reading, become a subscriber.

Explore our attractive subscription offers.

Click here

Or

To gain instant access to this article (download).


Pay
INR 59

(Readers in India)


Pay
$ 6

(Readers outside India)

Support Us

Your Support will ensure EPW’s financial viability and sustainability.

The EPW produces independent and public-spirited scholarship and analyses of contemporary affairs every week. EPW is one of the few publications that keep alive the spirit of intellectual inquiry in the Indian media.

Often described as a publication with a “social conscience,” EPW has never shied away from taking strong editorial positions. Our publication is free from political pressure, or commercial interests. Our editorial independence is our pride.

We rely on your support to continue the endeavour of highlighting the challenges faced by the disadvantaged, writings from the margins, and scholarship on the most pertinent issues that concern contemporary Indian society.

Every contribution is valuable for our future.