ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Wilson Cries Wolf Too Often

As Ministers depart for their holidays, and stuffy August days shroud in obscurity the pernickety details of what politicians and newspapermen suppose Britain is, the mythology of crisis that the Government has so assiduously purveyed since it first came to office, fades.

As Ministers depart for their holidays, and stuffy August days shroud in obscurity the pernickety details of what politicians and newspapermen suppose Britain is, the mythology of crisis that the Government has so assiduously purveyed since it first came to office, fades.Three policemen killed in one swoop at Shepherd's Bush provides a brief opportunity for hysteria and solemn diatribes on morality ... the violent crimes figures rise upwards, though very gently and provide copy for the press. The Prime Minister, with quick flashes of his lightening wrists, reshuffles his Cabinet so that all retain the same status as before but a little dust is stirred to obscure the Government's moral defeat by its own supporters on its penultimate measure, the Prices and Incomes Bill.The July trade figures were poor, all agree, but not impossible, or rather, obscured by a statistical understatement of exports; those that feel deeply, await the September exchange strains without promises. The Trade Union Congress at Brighton in early September will reopen the chicken's entrails, so painfully and unilluminatingly overexamined in the past two years.

The Coming deflation 
Britain is bored with crisis: Harold Wilson has cried "Wolf!" too many times to be taken seriously.Like the old lady at her seventh horror film, the fearful titillation palls. Untold disaster has been cited on every hand for "Britain"; Rome sank thus. With shorter and shorter skirts and more and more swing, the aged imperial battleship slides slowly down into a loveless sea, bands playing and reserves running out. Wilson, chin and pipe resolutely to the fore, surveys the wreckage of greatness, commands sacrifice but can no longer control the ungovernable greed and selfishness, the deathwish, of his people. At least, this is how the more romantic press likes to see it all. They do not simultaneously point out that, as always, one group of people do the urging to sacrifice and a quite different group does the sacrifice.

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