ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By Sukhadeo Thorat

Reimagining India’s Social Science Research Policy

A pioneering study by 31 social scientists, across nine research institutes, on the status of social science in India revealed progress as the country ranked 13th in research output among the 26 most productive countries. But it also revealed weakness in respect of research capacity, quantity, quality, and funding. In research output, India was ahead of China and Brazil in 1995, but China took over in 2007. In quality, although ahead of China, India remained short of Brazil. It revealed that the improvements through the national policy are imperative if the social sciences are to play their emancipatory role in knowledge creation and enlightenment.

 

Caste and Labour Market

This paper estimates the extent of discrimination in employment, occupation and wages against the Scheduled Castes and its impact on poverty in urban regular salaried labour market in recent years. Discrimination in employment and wages is found to be very high in private sector and lesser in public sector. Discrimination in employment and wages leads to reduced wage income which enhances poverty of the discriminated group. The finding calls for policy reform in both private and public sectors to ensure non-discriminatory access to SCs in employment and wages.

 

 

Has Growth Been Socially Inclusive during 1993-94 - 2009-10?

This paper examines the changes in poverty incidence and monthly per capita expenditure in India using the National Sample Survey's unit record data of three rounds, 1993-94, 2004-05 and 2009-10. The changes in poverty and growth in MPCE have been measured for major socio-religious and economic groups in both rural and urban sectors. This is complemented by the decomposition of the change in the incidence of poverty into the growth and distribution components. The results indicate that the poverty rate has declined at an accelerated rate during 2004-05 - 2009-10 for all socio-religious household groups. Growth has been more poverty reducing at an aggregate level during the period 2004-05 - 2009-10 as compared to 1993-94 - 2004-05. However, some groups benefited more than the others from poverty reduction. Inequality has also begun to adversely affect poverty reduction, particularly in the urban sector.

Caste and Ownership of Private Enterprises

Age-old restrictions on access to capital by certain social groups continue to reflect themselves in the scheduled caste and scheduled tribes owning far fewer private enterprises than warranted by their share in the population in both rurual and urban India. Recent nationwide data also reveal that when they do run business establishments these are mainly household enterprises organised around family labour. Poverty rates among the enterprises of the socially disadvantaged groups are also much higher than among the other castes.

Caste and Economic Discrimination: Causes, Consequences and Remedies

This paper provides a theoretical introduction to the study of discrimination with particular reference to the caste system. It sets the stage for the four empirical papers that follow, by highlighting the ways in which caste persists as a system of inequality that burdens the Indian economy with inefficiencies in the allocation of labour and other critical resources, reducing the full development of human capital in society. Far from disappearing as the economy modernises, discrimination remains a problem which, for reasons outlined here, is not amenable to self correction, but rather requires interventionist policies to remedy.

The Legacy of Social Exclusion

This article examines the prevalence of discrimination in the job application process of private sector enterprises in India. The study is based on a field experiment where authors replied to job advertisements in major English dailies sending three applications to each call - as an upper caste Hindu applicant, as a dalit and as a Muslim. Using statistical analysis they assess the data and find that discriminatory processes operate even at the first stage of the application process.