Mental Health: Treatment Gap, Awareness, Language

On the occasion of World Mental Health Day, we present a compilation of articles which give insight on Indian mental healthcare. 

 

Reetinder Kaur and R K Pathak (2017), write that political, social, cultural, and economic factors have long impeded mental healthcare:

"One major problem that exists in Indian mental healthcare is the treatment gap, or the number of individuals with an illness who need treatment but do not receive it."

 

"Major barriers to mental health service utilisation include a scarcity of resources, unequal distribution, inefficient use (Saxena et al 2007), non-medical explanations, and a lack of awareness, accessibility, and availability of healthcare services and the potential benefits of seeking treatment. Stigma and discrimination also contribute to the treatment gap in India."

 

 

 

A selection of articles discussing other aspects of mental health in India: 

 

  • "Let's Not Call Things Crazy": Saloni Diwakar (2017) writes about how language and the portrayal of mental illness can construct perceptions of the mentally ill negatively. 

 

  •  Clement Bayetti, Maan Barua, Nanda Kannuri, Sumeet Jain, Sushrut Jadhav (2015)  discuss how individual mental suffering is related to a wide range of local factors, by proposing an "ecology of suffering" which mediates between the sufferer and the "clinic." "Ecology" refers to the network of forces acting on and by the people suffering and those around him/her. 

 

  • Namita Ranganathan (2008) critically analyses the educational policies that have been adopted to reduce the mental ill-health of children.
Back to Top