The Exclusion Explainer: How the Hindu Right 'Others' Muslims

The Hindu right has demonised the Indian Muslim. Their identity has been appropriated to enforce a communal and divisive narrative that questions their right to be considered "Indian." The Indian Muslim is the "Other"—an impostor, an impersonator, and an infiltrator. 

To pass as Indian in their everyday life, the Indian Muslim is forced to suppress their religious identity and assume one that agrees with the majoritarian view. This diagram represents the many facets of otherisation, and the performative nature of Muslim identity in the social sphere.

 

Note: If you are viewing this feature on a handheld device, please pinch the screen to make use of the zoom feature

This feature is based on Rustom Bharucha's 2003 article "Muslims and Others: Anecdotes, Fragments and Uncertainties of Evidence" which investigates assumptions of cultural identity, and the othering of minorities through identitarian constructions. 

 

Curated by Kieran Lobo [kieran@epw.in]

Designed by Gulal Salil [gulal@epw.in]

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