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ILO Convention 190

The most important factor in increasing women’s employment is access to safe transport. In India, women often have no choice but to decline job opportunities that are far from home or that do not have proper transport connectivity. Forced immobility of women is a consequence of the violence and insecurity faced daily during the commute to and from work.

The Haryana State Assembly Elections 2019

The history of the political patterns in Haryana is traced. The ground realities of the changing electoral moods in the region are brought to the forefront with a focus on the larger political picture that goes much beyond what are called mere political gimmicks.

Rising Unemployment in India

The rise in the unemployment rate in the recent years along with its convergence across states could be an indicator of a positive change in the economy. Its association with educational attainments and urbanisation is testimony to the brighter side of the development story of India. Further, this rise, against the backdrop of the falling share of the informal sector employment, may suggest that the labour market participants can now afford to remain unemployed instead of getting residually absorbed in petty activities. However, this must not undermine the larger issue of employment creation, which has been a matter of great concern since long.

Neglect of Household Biomedical Waste

While India has had a biomedical waste management rule since 1998, which was modified for ease in 2016, household biomedical waste has been neglected. Increased lifespan, rise of non-communicable diseases, the growing buying power, and better access to healthcare have resulted in the increased generation of household biomedical waste. This poses serious challenges to a frail public health system. This growing problem needs to be tackled by acknowledging it, introducing guidelines, and decentralising solutions, including facilitating recycling.

Child Undernutrition in India

The child undernutrition estimates from the Comprehensive National Nutrition Survey, 2016–18 reveal that many Indian states have made substantial decline, reversing their poor past record in wasting, ranging from 7 to 14 percentage points within just 30 months. Is it really possible to make such a large decline in such a short span of time? Or, does this point to an anomaly in data or estimation?

ASHAs’ Health Services

The intrinsic commitment of the accredited social health activists towards the well-being of the community is unduly exploited by the state in the name of “volunteerism.” It is high time a wholesome definition of work is adopted to understand the inconspicuous contributions made by these front-line healthcare workers, who form a key link in the public health system in India.

Voluntary Relocation and the Violation of Forest Rights in Kerala

Voluntary relocation of Adivasis from the Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary has been going on since 2012, violating all existing legislations, including the Forest Rights Act, 2006. The 2008 guidelines of the National Tiger Conservation Authority, meant for the relocation of villages from tiger reserves, have been followed in this area, even though it has neither been notified as a critical wildlife habitat under the Forest Rights Act, nor a core area in the tiger reserve.

The Invisible Collateral

A borrower may hesitate to borrow from her close relatives and family members as it costs them in terms of reduction in social insurance in the case of default. This invisible cost reduces credit risk. India’s household indebtedness survey shows some evidence on these borrowing preferences. This perspective on borrowing decisions derived from the community can be used as one of the dimensions in credit risk evaluation and in policy formulation.

Ayushman Bharat

Taking into consideration the model of the Ayushman Bharat–Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana, some valid questions regarding the operationality and feasibility of the scheme are examined. The shortcomings of the scheme are brought forth and a solution is offered so that the scheme does not stand in contradiction to various health schemes of the past.

The Real Chowkidars of India

Looking at the profile of chowkidars (watchmen), using National Sample Survey Office unit-level data, it is evident that their work conditions are deplorable. A typical chowkidar is a middle-aged male with poor education and skills, working in urban areas on a low salary and without any written job contract or social security coverage. Instead of appropriating them as a metaphor for political gains, ensuring their job security should be a policy priority.

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