ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By Vinish Kathuria

Impact of Political Regime and Ideology on Renewable Energy Installations in India

The Indian renewable energy sector has seen two ideological shifts post 2014: one, focus shifted greatly to solar, and two, increased focus to competitive bidding in policy design. The paper examines if regime change and political ideology have any influence on the “type” of renewable energy. No convincing evidence is found of either a changed political regime or differing ideology of union and state governments on the trajectory of renewable energy installations once we control for other variables.

Post-COVID-19 Challenges in the Indian IT Industry

The information technology industry has been the hallmark of the Indian growth story since the 1980s. The Indian IT sector has relied heavily on non-home markets for demand and resources and built deep global ties using co-location with clients, enabled by international travel and temporary on-site migration, acting as a key mechanism in developing “cognitive proximity.” However, the COVID-19 pandemic is expected to make international travel and migration more restrictive and costlier, maybe for a long time. The paradigm shift creates significant barriers for IT firms to be able to maintain cognitive proximity with its clients and could adversely impact their global competitiveness.

Organised versus Unorganised Manufacturing Performance in the Post-Reform Period

This paper analyses the productivity performance of both the organised and unorganised segments of the Indian manufacturing sector using unit level data. Both partial and total factor productivity measures are employed. Our analysis reveals that labour productivity has increased for the organised sector over time, whereas both labour productivity and capital intensity growth have slowed down in the unorganised sector during the period between 2000-01 and 2004-05. The improvement in TFP growth in organised manufacturing in the post-2000 period as compared to the second half of the 1990s across most states in India is heartening as also the fact that output growth was mostly productivity-driven in the post-reform period. However, the declining TFP and the increasing capital intensity of the unorganised sector are causes of worry and raise several important questions.

Vulnerability to Air Pollution:Is There Any Inequity in Exposure?

This study tries to find evidence of environmental inequity by looking into the relationship between socio-economic characteristics and air pollution exposure. This is carried out by first computing a household specific air pollution exposure index for 347 households around seven pollution monitoring stations in Delhi. The index is then used in a multivariate regression to look into the environmental equity aspect. The analysis yields that the economically backward communities are the most affected by the exposure to air pollution. However, the study does not find any evidence of environmental inequity due to religion and social backwardness. Education facilitates defence against the exposure, when it crosses a threshold level. The separate analysis of residential and industrial areas suggests that exposure to air pollution is dependent, though not systematically, on the location of residence, besides socio-economic status.