ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Vani K BorooahSubscribe to Vani K Borooah

Evaluating the Social Orientation of the Integrated Child Development Services Programme

Examining who the beneficiaries are of the Integrated Child Development Services programme, an spect that has been neglected, this paper presents econometric estimates regarding the relative strength of personal and household circumstances in determining the likelihood of utilising the programme's services. These estimates suggest that inter-group differences in utilisation rates have less to do with characteristics and much more to do with group identity. The paper also suggests a trade-off between quality and utilisation by hypothesising that the poor quality of services leads upper-caste mothers to exit the ICDS market and seek these services elsewhere.

Corruption in India

This article represents one of the fi rst attempts at quantifying the level of corruption in India. This has been made possible by the unique website ipaidabribe.com which invites people who paid a bribe to record their experience. By choosing a specifi c issue - identity verifi cation by a police offi cer prior to issuing a passport - it was able to focus on a "harassment" bribe, that is a bribe paid for something a person was legally entitled to.

Social Exclusion and Jobs Reservation in India

The root of the problem of poor dalit achievement in India lies in the many dysfunctional primary and secondary schools in the villages and towns. Affirmative action policies, which are implemented to boost a deprived group's employment rate, suffer from several defects, in particular, they have only a small effect when the group's educational base is low. Social exclusion robs people of their "confidence" and this loss adversely affects their capacity to function.

Religion, Literacy, and the Female-to-Male Ratio

This paper proposes a new explanation for religious differences in fertility in India by incorporating the issue of gender bias into the debate. It reports the results from an econometric investigation of the factors influencing the sex ratio at birth and among currently living children, by religion and by caste, for a sample of over 10,000 women. The investigation paid particular attention to religion and caste by subdividing the sample into Hindu, Muslim and dalit women who had all terminated their fertility. It enquired whether the effect of different variables on the sex ratio varied according to the religion and caste of the women. The econometric analysis found that a husband being literate served to raise the sex ratio ? both at birth and of currently living children ? but that the effect of husbands? literacy was stronger for Muslims and dalits than it was for Hindus. In other words, while the illiteracy of husbands exacerbated ?son preference? (and its obverse, ?daughter aversion?), the preference for sons (and the aversion to daughters) exercised a stronger hold on Hindu families than it did on Muslim and dalit families.
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