ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

T P SinghSubscribe to T P Singh

The Invisible Killers-A Rejoinder

ners could be to reduce hard currency import and to see that there is not much obvious "fat" in the hard currency import bill. But this may hot be acceptable to the Soviet planners. For instance, the import of machinery, which is a priority item, accounted for about a-third of the hard currency imports which the Soviet planners wish to maintain at any cost. Nearly one-fifth of the hard currency import was foodgrain which might not decline in the coming decades, considering the highly volatile nature of Soviet grain production. The Soviet Union imported rolled steel item, mainly steel pipes, for the gas industry which accounts for 14 per cent of the import bill. Considering these factors, Hewett feels that there may not be any possibility of substantial reduction in hard currency imports of the USSR, The major area which the Soviet planners would like to explore for maintaining high import bill will be export of more of manufactured industrial products in view of the possibilities of declining surplus of oil and energy for export. But the export of industrial manufactured goods to the developed capitalist countries is a hard nut to crack. The Soviet Union faces a number of constraints in the export of industrial manufacturing goods
Back to Top