ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Whither the Tunisian Citizen's Revolt?

It would be foolish to expect smooth transitions after the mass revolts in some Arab countries. One will see unexpected events, the emergence of new forces and weakened states in places where dictators ruled. This is inevitable since new forces have not consolidated power and learned how to re-establish effective new states. With the economies in a shambles, job creation - a major popular demand - has had to be put on hold, thereby making an expectant population ever more frustrated and angry. Tunisia has become a mass society, ready to be mobilised. It is waiting for leaders to emerge who can rally electoral majorities and rule effectively.

Democracy Triumphsin Tunisia's First Free Elections

Despite attempts to demonise Tunisia's Al-Nahda, the Islamist party emerged as the most important in the elections held last month. Tunisia, where the Arab spring began, has shown what the ballot box can achieve.

Arab Dictatorships under Fire in the New Information Age

Tens of thousands of Tunisians came out on to the streets and overthrew a dictatorship that had been in power for two decades. What took place in Tunisia is only the first step in a mass movement for change within the wider Arab world and beyond where dictators rule. The Information Age that we live in has provided young people everywhere with new means to organise and control their own media.
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