ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Smriti SinghSubscribe to Smriti Singh

Sounding the Battle Cry

The Supreme Court’s judgment of 17 February 2020, granting women permanent commission in the army, has opened the doors for women to seek benefits and status associated with seniority of rank. Even though the apex court’s ruling is restricted to non-combat or non-armoured corps, it still is a big win for women. However, the idea of women in the armed forces requires deeper engagement. There is a need to understand what should be envisioned and expected from opening the doors of a male bastion for women.

Piecing the Puzzle

Routledge Handbook of Education in India: Debates, Practices, and Policies edited by Krishna Kumar, Oxon and New York: Routledge, 2018; pp xiv + 302, ` 2,495.

Fallacies of a Supreme Court Judgment

A higher proportion of acquittals is often put forward as evidence to suggest that Section 498A of the Indian Penal Code has been continuously misused. This position appears to focus on interpersonal violence, overlooking the various subliminal factors governing the everyday lives of women, such as the varied forms of violence and the role of gendered state institutions in conceptualising and implementing law. This paper considers the complexities of law enforcement from the survivors' perspective to investigate the dynamics of the formation of a new perception regarding the misuse of Section 498A.
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