ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Shantha SinhaSubscribe to Shantha Sinha

Cash Transfers and UID

We support cash transfers such as old-age pensions, widow pensions, maternity entitlements and scholarships. However, we oppose the government’s plan for accelerated mass conversion of welfare schemes to Unique Identification Authority (UID)-driven cash transfers. This plan could cause havoc and...

Neglect of Children under Six

The following is an open letter to prime minister Manmohan Singh: We are writing to express our deep concern about the neglect of children under six in the Union Budget 2007-08. You may remember meeting some of us on December 19 last year (just after “Bal Adhikar Samvad”), when we discussed the...

Infant Survival: A Political Challenge

In a democracy, every child must be regarded as indispensable and the government must be accountable for the deaths of children and mothers. Unfortunately, the issue of children's health seldom finds space in contemporary political discourse in India. The process of ensuring that every child is taken care of as a matter of right involves societal pressure through public action and democratisation of all public institutions.

Emphasising Universal Principles towards Deepening of Democracy

If we are to nurture and strengthen democracy and build a secular society in India, participation by all as equal citizens is imperative. In this regard, education of the whole population is essential. Although the transformation of a country from a high level of illiteracy to one of near universal literacy cannot be achieved overnight, the fact remains that the status of a child going to school contrasts sharply with that of a full-time worker, even in a situation of low literacy levels. The school going child is treated primarily as a student and any work performed by him/her cannot be at the expense of his/her school activities. In other words, it is accepted that the primary activity of the child is that of a student and not a worker. Therefore, any programme to increase literacy levels among children must necessarily also be a programme to reduce the incidence of child labour. The two objectives are contingent on each other.
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