ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Sanjay KumarSubscribe to Sanjay Kumar

Low Levels of Electoral Participation in Metropolitan Cities

In successive elections, electoral participation in India’s big, metropolitan cities has been lower vis-à-vis semi-urban and rural constituencies. In the absence of any empirical evidence, this phenomenon is often attributed by the media and political commentators to middle-class apathy and their disdain towards electoral politics. This article contests the popular claim and argues that in big cities, it is not the middle class but the urban poor who are unable to exercise their franchise.

The Decline of the Congress Party in Indian Politics

From being the single dominant party in India to its pathetic performance in the recently held assembly elections in five states, the Congress party has been on a steady downhill journey. This article looks at its trajectory post independence and especially in the aftermath of the 2014 general election.

Jharkhand Assembly Election

The Jharkhand assembly election saw the Bharatiya Janata Party and its poll partner, the All Jharkhand Students Union Party, secure an absolute majority by winning 42 seats. The absence of a united opposition; a lukewarm Congress; the Jharkhand Mukti Morcha ceding ground in Santhal Parganas; large-scale defections of Jharkhand Vikas Morcha legislators; and a record voter turnout ensured that the result went the BJP way. The party also benefi ted from its urban popularity, the consolidation of the Hindu vote and being in power at the centre.

BJP's Victory in Haryana

The Bharatiya Janata Party pulled off a win in Haryana despite never having had a significant support base in the state or projecting a specifi c leader as its chief ministerial candidate. Aided by infighting in the Congress and the ineptness of the Indian National Lok Dal, the BJP's strategy was to sell the benefit of having the same party in power at the centre and in the state. Barring Jat-dominated west Haryana, the Narendra Modi factor and a social coalition of brahmins, other upper castes and dalits saw it win support in all regions, especially in urban constituencies and among educated and upper-class voters. Yet, it is still early days, and the Congress could prove worrisome if the BJP does not make good on its promises.

BJP Crafts a New Social Coalition in Bihar

The electoral verdict in Bihar can be attributed to two factors. One, there was a clear preference among the voters for change at the centre. Two, the Bharatiya Janata Party's emphasis on carefully crafting a caste alliance allowed it to leapfrog its rivals.

Can the BJP Revive Itself in 2014?

A study of the vote share of the Bharatiya Janata Party over the past four Lok Sabha elections indicates a sharp fall in support among its core constituency of the rich and middle-class voters. Recent indications of a surge in support for the BJP points to a return of these classes to it, while the Congress has seen a whittling away of support from all classes of voters. Will this be enough to ensure a victory for the BJP in the next general elections?

Citizen-Students and the University

The proposed 4-year undergraduate degree programme of the Delhi University is being pushed through in undue haste without adequate debate and public discussion. The special emphasis on Foundation and Integrating Mind, Body and Heart courses, controversial components of the 4-year scheme, is indicative of an extra-academic zeal. The pedagogical thinking behind these courses is authoritarian and against the spirit of liberal citizenship.

The Weakening of Electoral Anti-Incumbency

Anti-incumbency at the state level, or the tendency to vote out an incumbent state government, reached its peak in elections during the 1990s. In the 2000s there has been a reversal of this trend and a shift towards pro-incumbency or a tendency of voters to re-elect the ruling party at the time of elections.

District-Level Estimates of Fertility and Implied Sex Ratio at Birth in India

With an emphasis on decentralised planning in India, the district has become the primary unit of planning and monitoring development programmes. The Census of India is the only source providing useful demographic information at the district and administrative levels below it. The findings of this study indicate that India is undergoing a fertility transition, yet around one-third of districts have a birth rate of 25 or more. High fertility districts have shown a faster pace of decline. Furthermore, around a quarter of the districts are characterised by a very low implied sex ratio at birth, of less than 900. Spatial analysis reveals a contiguous pattern of low ratios in the north-western part of the country and emerging pockets in Maharashtra and Gujarat followed by Orissa.

Why Did Dalits Desert the Bahujan Samaj Party in Uttar Pradesh?

In trying to explain why so many dalits failed to vote for the Bahujan Samaj Party, it is found that there are strong "performance effects" that determined voter choice in the 2012 assembly elections in Uttar Pradesh. In the eyes of many dalits, particularly the young and the well-off, the BSP did not perform well enough on key issues of governance. The strongest effects for performance issues related to corruption and development during the BSP'S rule.

Jharkhand Assembly Elections: An Analysis

An assessment of votes polled in the Jharkhand assembly elections in November-December 2009 suggests that the Congress has made major gains in the state, though it was unable to form the government in coalition with its pre-election alliance partner, the Jharkhand Vikas Morcha.

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