ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

S K MohantySubscribe to S K Mohanty

Understanding the Distribution of BPL Cards: All-India and Selected States

Using the recent National Family and Health Survey-3 data, this paper examines the distribution of below poverty line cards. The possession of bpl cards by the households in various economic and social settings index is analysed. The findings suggest that about two-fifths of the bpl cards in India are with the non-poor households. On the other hand, in many of the states a majority of households in abject deprived groups do not possess a bpl card. The extent of misuse is higher in Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Kerala, while it is lower in Tamil Nadu. In economically weaker states like Orissa and Bihar, a higher proportion of non-poor households possess a bpl card.

Household Deprivation and Its Linkages with Reproductive Health Utilisation

The household deprivation scores, based on the availability of some basic amenities to a household and the presence of a literate adult member, have been applied to data sets of the three National Family Health Surveys to study the trends in deprivation levels over 1992-2006 and the correlates of selected reproductive and child heath parameters with household deprivation levels. It is found that the proportion of households classified as "deprived" on the basis of the hds has recorded a secular declining trend over this period and that the quantum of decline in the proportions of the deprived is strongly associated with improvements in reproductive and child health parameters. Analysis of the data on malnourishment of children reveals that the availability of some basic amenities at the household level makes a significant contribution to children's growth and prevention of malnutrition.

Deprivation of Basic Amenities by Caste and Religion

In a modern market-oriented economy, possession of basic social and physical necessities of life can be considered the basis of a dividing line of different levels of deprivation. This paper, by using consecutive NFHS data (1992 and 1999), attempts to estimate levels of deprivation based on possessions at the household level of some basic amenities of life. It examines changes in levels of deprivation, categorised as 'abject deprivation', 'moderate deprivation', 'just above deprivation' and 'well above deprivation' across Indian states and also analyses changes in terms of caste and religion.
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