ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

S Irudaya RajanSubscribe to S Irudaya Rajan

Demographic and Health Diversity in the Era of SDGs

Despite the progress achieved in demographic and health-related indicators, achieving targets in the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 remains a demanding task. This study acts as a perfect benchmark for monitoring several demographics and health-related indicators in the era of the SDGs. There is a need to advance the right sources of data and cutting-edge tools for measuring and monitoring progress. The efforts to reduce regional disparities in demographic and health-related indicators are hindered by the lack of adequate funding to the programmes and the absence of reliable micro-level evidence-based policy.

Research on International Migration from India Needs a Fresh Start

Indians constitute the highest number of international migrants worldwide after the Chinese. Globally, India ranks at the top for the amount of annual foreign remittances it receives. Despite its significance, research on migration in India has substantial gaps, which underlines the need for further exploration.

New Evidences from the Kerala Migration Survey, 2018

The Kerala Migration Survey 2018, eighth in the series of studies on migration undertaken by the Centre for Development Studies, sheds light on the various issues concerning migration and mobility, based on a large-scale sample survey of 15,000 households. It gathers the findings of two decades of research done at the CDS and examines migration dynamics from multiple perspectives: demographic, economic and sociopolitical. As per the KMS 2018, there are 2.1 million emigrants from Kerala across the world. However, there has been a decline of 3 lakh emigrants during 2013–18. The estimated total remittances to Kerala are₹85,092 crore, an increase from ₹71,142 crore reported in 2014. This is due to the fact that Keralites in the Gulf have climbed up the social ladder and earn higher wages, allowing them to remit more.

Draft Emigration Bill, 2019

The evolution of the Indian Emigration Policy framework is traced since the inception of the Emigration Act, 1922, and the draft Emigration Bill, 2019 is examined. While the 2019 draft bill includes all emigrant workers and students within its purview, it continues to exclude the family and undocumented migrants. Given the magnitude of family migration from India, this is a major oversight. Of the different stages of the migrant life cycle, the 2019 draft bill focuses mostly on pre-departure while ignoring the rights of migrants at their destination and their eventual return migration. For the draft Emigration Bill, 2019 to be truly effective, it needs a rights-based approach inclusive of all Indian migrants abroad.

The Realities of Voting in India

While the nature of work and consequent socio-economic realities deprive migrant workers within India of their voting rights, the lack of official documentation of internal migration, especially for informal employment, prevents any conscientious policy actions for addressing the issue.

Kerala’s Flood Disaster

In the event of devastating floods in Kerala, what would be the impact on migration and remittances, and what role can the diaspora play in the reconstruction of the state? Migration, as a livelihood strategy, is expected to increase in the aftermath of floods as people try to mitigate economic loss and uncertainty.

Nursing Education in India

This article explores the history of nursing education in India, and the state, community and market factors contributing to its recent growth. The quality of training offered in these mushrooming institutions, however, tends to be poor. Regularisation and standardisation remain the greatest challenges for Indian nursing. Graduating nurses face job shortages and poor working conditions, especially in the private sector. Understanding the nursing education sector is important in the aftermath of the central government’s mandate to increase the wages of nurses in private hospitals.

Tamil Nadu Migration Survey 2015

Tamil Nadu is considered a mobile society because its people have a history of migration and a significant diaspora presence in 17 countries across the world. In spite of high mobility being recurrent in Tamil Nadu, there is a lack of comprehensive studies on this theme. The Tamil Nadu Migration Survey 2015 is the first attempt to study the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of migrants, return migrants, outmigrants, and return outmigrants in the state, remittances received, cost of migration, and the problems they face abroad. TMS 2015 is a broad replication of previously conducted Kerala Migration Surveys.

Update on Trends in Sex Ratio at Birth in India

With additional data available at more regular intervals on sex ratio at birth, it is easier to track changes without depending on the decennial censuses. However, the diversity of sources also means differences in trends across sources and regions. A brief analysis of the latest available data is presented to identify the most recent trends and concerns in states that need attention, like north-western and eastern states of India.

Kerala Migration Study 2014

Ever since the Centre for Development Studies started its research on Gulf migration through what has now come to be known as the Kerala Migration Study, emigration from Kerala has been on the increase. The number of emigrants from Kerala according to the KMS 2014 is larger than what was estimated in the 2011 study. Kerala's economy is largely sustained by the emigrants' remittances. This article looks at the impact of migration on Kerala's economy and society.

Coming Back to Normal?

An analysis of data from Censuses 2001 and 2011 shows that despite the increase in overall population sex ratio in this period, the 0-6 sex ratio and 0-1 sex ratio have continued to decline. This suggests that there is no let-up in daughter defi cit. However, one positive factor is that the north-western states which have had a long history of high levels of daughter defi cit have shown an increase in the 0-1 sex ratio. The reasons for this need to be determined. Another positive aspect is that daughter defi cit seems to be lower amongst the younger cohort of currently married women; it will be interesting to see whether this persists as the cohort ages.

Pages

Back to Top