ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Ravi SundaramSubscribe to Ravi Sundaram

Uncanny Networks

Cities have borne the brunt of the new globalisation both in transformative and imaginative terms. Yet at the very moment that scholarship seems ready to engage with the Indian city, contemporary globalisation has in fact slowly eroded the old modernist compact of 'the city'. This splintered urbanism has become a significant theatre of elite engagement with claims of globalisation. Using Delhi's media networks as an example this article suggests that new domains of non-legal practices could pose significant problems for classic strategies of incorporation and management in political society. These non-legal domains open up new spaces of disorder and constant conflict in Indian cities that threaten the current self-perceptions of the globalising elite.

Modernity and Its Victims

Modernity and Its Victims Ravi Sundaram Modernity and the Holocaust by Zygmunt Bauman; Polity Press, Oxford, IN an oft-quoted statement, the late Theodor Adorno once said that it is impossible to write poetry after Auschwitz. For Adorno and many of his generation, social theory could never be the same after the holocaust, the universalist meta-nanatives of western civilisation could not prevent the slaughter of millions in gas chambers. True to his word, Adorno went on to write Negative Dialectics, a trenchant critique of the foundations of western philosophy from Hegel to Heidegger. For a long time Adorno's philosophical tour de force re mained a solitary. .juiry into the relevance of social critique after the holocaust. Historians of the holocaust (and there are many) have tended to focus more on the uniqueness of acts of genocide by the Nazis rather than raise crucial questions on the relevance of the holocaust for modernity.1 This gap is remedied by the publication of Zygmunt Bauman's Modernity and the Holocaust. In the best tradition of critical theory, Bauman refuses to see the holocaust as but the irruption of a pre-modern barbarism on the continuum of history, rather, genocide is a possibility inherent in the civilising process itself. For Bauman the holocaust was "a legitimate resident in the house of modernity" (p 17); it is this statement that is explicated in various chapters of the book.

The German Enigma

Discussions of German economic strength have often avoided normative questions about the stability of democratic institutions in the German republic; the fact remains that German capitalism has not hesitated to take extreme steps in the past or safeguard its interests. All discussions about German identity tend to centre on that country's incomplete political revolution

Socialism at the End of the Century-Reflections on an Epoch Passed

Reflections on an Epoch Passed Krishnendu Ray Ravi Sundaram The Russian Revolution of 1917 fashioned the contours of a new global epoch. The conclusive termination of this epoch by the events of 1989 and the transition to a new historical time have generated a crisis of Marxism. The project of renewal of Marxism and the identification of its sources demand a response in terms of a fundamental re-evaluation of the project undertaken in the name of socialism for the past seven decades: To this end the present essay makes an attempt to comprehend the crisis through ah examination of the developments in the Soviet Union since 1917.

Socialism at the End of the Century-Reflections on an Epoch Passed

Reflections on an Epoch Passed Krishnendu Ray Ravi Sundaram The Russian Revolution of 1917 fashioned the contours of a new global epoch. The conclusive termination of this epoch by the events of 1989 and the transition to a new historical time have generated a crisis of Marxism, The project of renewal of Marxism and the identification of its sources demand a response in terms of a fundamental re-evaluation of the project undertaken in the name of socialism for the past seven decades. To this end the present essay makes an attempt to comprehend the crisis through an examination of the developments in the Soviet Union since 1917.
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