ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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A Survey of Human Rights in India

​ Mapping Human Rights and Subalterns in Modern India edited by Jagannatham Begari; New Delhi: Kalpaz Publications, 2015; pp 305, ₹ 990 .

Greenpeace Ban: Violation of Rights

(The following are extracts from an open letter sent to the Minister of Home Affairs, Rajnath Singh, protesting against the decision to freeze Greenpeace India’s accounts.) The move by the central government to freeze Greenpeace India’s bank accounts and block sources of funds, is a blatant...

Priya Pillai Case

The case of Greenpeace India activist Priya Pillai is a stark example of how the space for democratic dissent in India is not only shrinking alarmingly but also of the central government's parsimony with the truth. In the entire sorry episode underlining the blatant violation of human rights, the Intelligence Bureau, which seems to be a law unto itself, has played a major role.

Akshardham Judgment - I

The Supreme Court judgment in the Akshardham temple attack case has acquitted six innocent men who were tortured and then made to suffer imprisonment. The Supreme Court has come down hard on the investigating agencies of Gujarat and the way in which the lower judiciary has functioned in this case. The apex court must take this forward and revisit the existing prosecutions under the Prevention of Terrorism Act and examine the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act which incorporates many of the pota provisions.

The Ehsan Jafri Case

The report by the International Human Rights and Confl ict Resolution Clinic of Stanford Law School, When Justice Becomes the Victim - The Quest for Justice After the 2002 Violence in Gujarat, indicts the lower echelons of the Indian judiciary and makes a case for reforms in the criminal judicial system.

Prevention of Torture Bill: A Feeble Attempt

Despite signing the United Nations Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment in 1997, India is ratifying it only now with parliamentary consideration of the Prevention of Torture Bill, 2010. However, the bill fails to comply with the basic requirements of the UN Convention. In fact, it shows up the government's reluctance to give effect to the Convention and resolutely address the endemic problem of torture. The bill needs serious reworking if a new law has to have any effect on the widespread use of torture and other cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment routinely meted out to suspects and detainees by law enforcement officials.

The Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Amendment Act 2008: Repeating Past Mistakes

The rushed amendments to the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act 2004 reveal that the government lacks any new ideas about how to tackle terrorism. And yet, India has the benefit of past experience, both with terrorist attacks and different legislative anti-terrorism frameworks.
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