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Government Should Respond to Maoist Offer

We welcome the announcement by the Communist Party of India (Maoist) to observe a ceasefire and enter into talks with the government of India. Given the government’s expressed willingness to engage in talks, we hope that this offer will be reciprocated. This necessarily requires an immediate halt to...

Crisis of Socialism-Notes in Defence of a Commitment

Notes in Defence of a Commitment Randhir Singh It is necessary to make a point which is often obscured in the current despair or euphoria over the 'crisis of socialism' we are witnessing. Though diversely damaging in its consequences the crisis takes nothing away from the historic significance of the world's first socialist revolution or from the achievements of 'historical communism' as it is being described in certain epitaph-like pronouncements these days. Without historical communism the world would have been a far more inhuman and hopeless place.

Terrorism, State Terrorism and Democratic Rights

Democratic Rights Randhir Singh In a class-divided, exploitative society like ours, on all important issues in philosophy as in real life, neutrality is an illusion. And so it is with terrorism and democratic rights. It is our explanation or understanding of social reality, which indicates the prescription as well. An explanation thus always has a 'value slope'. And if it is this 'value slope' which is decisive in suggesting the purposeful human intervention on our part, then obviously it matters how we generally go about explaining and/or understanding things. In other words we need to be selfconsciously aware of our philosophical or methodological orientation in coming to terms with the reality around us. How does the dominant mode of thinking deal with the issues of terrorism, state terrorism and democratic rights? And how do we need to think about them?

The Tradition of Marxism

The Tradition of Marxism At a time when anything and everything claims the fashionable mantle of Marxism, and so many Marxists are busy revising it out of existence, a certain orthodoxy a commitment to 'Marxism of Karl Marx' is not only in order, it is necessary if one would take the issues of socialist theory and practice seriously We do not set ourselves up against the world in doctrinaire fashion with a new principle: Here is the truth! Here you must kneel! We develop new principles for the world out of the principles of the existing world. .. It is the great advantage of the new movement that we do not seek to anticipate the new world dogmatically, but rather to discover it in the criticism of the old. . . It is not out task to build up the future in advance and to settle all problems for alt time; our task is ruthless criticism of everything that exists, ruthless in the sense that the criticism will not shrink either from its own conclusions or from conflict with the powers that be. , .

Visions for the Future One View

'Visions for the Future': One View Randhir Singh Indian economic development, with its structural logic of inequality and unevenness, has produced not only 'two Indias' and an ever widening gulf between the two, but also a society of myriad old and new oppressions, insecurities and alienations, with no jobs or ideals for its youth or vision and values for the people, a society in deep social and moral crisis.

Theorising Communalism-A Fragmentary Note in the Marxist Mode

A Fragmentary Note in the Marxist Mode Randhir Singh Most contemporary thinking, writing or theorising on communalism is seriously flawed by an ideological error on the one hand and a methodological limitation on the other. The ideological error which has virtually pre-empted the entire field of thought or study on communalism in this country lies in understanding communalism from the standpoint of nationalism. And the methodological limitation lies in studying contemporary communalism in an essentially empiricist and often a historical manner

Marxists and the Sikh Extremist Movement in Punjab

The Sikh extremists' ideological-political practice, insofar as they have one, constitutes no real threat to the ruling classes in India, whatever immediate Haw and order' problems it may pose. On the contrary it only serves their more basic political and ideological needs. The correct line of opposition to the Sikh extremist movement, therefore, is to see the struggle against the extremists as part of the broader all-India struggle against the ruling classes' economy politics, culture, etc; as part of the revolutionary struggle against the present social order.
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