ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Ramachandra GuhaSubscribe to Ramachandra Guha

Where Fact Crosses Fiction

In an Antique Land by Amitav Ghosh; Ravi Dayal Publisher, New Delhi, SOME years ago, the American critic Clifford Geertz wrote of a process of Intellectual deprovincialisation' that was making steady progress in the academy. The divisions between different disciplines, noted Geertz, were now running at some 'highly eccentric angles'. The most exciting work in the human sciences

Prehistory of Indian Environmentalism-Intellectual Traditions

Intellectual Traditions Ramachandra Guha The historical study of natural resource conflict and the anthropological study of indigenous conservation systems are two important ways in which we can construct a lineage for Indian environmentalism. This essay takes up yet a third alternative, the provision of an intellectual genealogy for the movement. The concern here is with those forgotten thinkers in India who, in a rational, reflective mode, provided important insights into people's relationship with nature.

Ideological Trends in Indian Environmentalism

Ideological Trends in Indian Environmentalism Ecology, Socialism, Ecological Socialism? SEVERAL years ago, Ronald Reagan proclaimed to the British parliament that his life's ambition was to consign Marxism to the ash heap of history. Yet the impending demise of socialism (in whichever of its variants) has been predicted not merely by its historic enemies on the right, but by the radical ecology movement as well. "We are neither right nor left", assert the German Greens, "but in front." For many of its leading theorists, the ecology movement is playing in this century the role assigned by history to socialism in the last. The correct radical response to the evils of nineteenth century capitalism may have been the socialist movement, but the lat- ter's heritage is believed to be totally inadequate in tackling the contemporary crises of industrial society. In this vision, radical ecology may be inheriting the political mantle of socialism, but at the same time it rests on a 'paradigm shift' that opposes it to both socialism and the common enemy, capitalism (Capra and Spretnak 1984; Porrit 1984).

Presentation of Class in Everyday Life

Weapons of the Weak: Everyday Forms of Peasant Resistance by James C Scott; New Haven, Yale University Press, 1986; pp xxii + 374. CONTRACTED to work an eight hour day for a fixed wage, a labourer in rural Bihar is reminded that he is to work uninterruptedly except for an half-hour lunch break. Yet agricultural work, especially on someone else's land and under a hot sun, can be onerous; and the worker takes advantage of the employer's temporary absence. Repairing to the shade of a nearby mango tree, he prepares some tobacco and is contentedly chewing when the employer returns. The master delivers himself of a sermon on hard work and the terms of the contract, but is surprised to find the incident repeated the next day This goes on for several days; until the employer gives in. The workers tobacco break

Ecological Roots of Development Crisis

Ecological Roots of Development Crisis Ramachandra Guha The State of India's Environment 1984-85: The Second Citizen's Report edited by Anil Agarwal and Sunita Narain; Centre for Science and Environment, New Delhi, 1985; pp xvii + 393, Rs 320.

CAPITAL VIEW

compounded not only by giving weightage to Centrally-sponsored schemes in different areas of development which fall within the sphere of responsibility of the states, but also by more detailed supervision by Central authorities of the allocation of funds and their deployment under these schemes. This is bound to hamstring the initiative of the states in the implementation of these schemes in the light of local conditions and circumstances. Such a dispensation is bound to create frictions and tensions in Centre- State relations which will in due course find political expressions in a variety of ways and forms. The fact is that the Prime Minister does not subscribe and is indeed allergic to the concept and principles of a federal polity. He is fond of insisting that India is not a federal set-up but is a union in which Central authority is supreme and must prevail in regulating relations between the Centre and states. This is the basic position which colours his views on strengthening national unity and integration.

How Social is Social Forestry

How 'Social' is Social Forestry? Ramachandra Guha Social Forestry in India: Problems and Prospects by N D Bachketi; Radiant Publishers, for Birla Institute of Scientific Research, New Delhi, 1984;

The Forest Question

Ramachandra Guha Towards a New Forest Policy: PeopIe's Rights and Environmental Needs edited by W Fernandes and S Kulkarni; Indian Social Institute, New Delhi, 1983; pp 155, Rs 25.

Forestry in British and Post-British India-A Historical Analysis

A Historical Analysis Ramachandra Guha The current debate on the draft Forest Act has necessitated an examination of forest policies in India. This article, while analysing colonial and post-colonial forest policies, concentrates on the historical process whereby the traditionally-held rights of the forest communities have been progressively curtailed through the development of forest policy, management and legislation.

Forestry in British and Post-British India-A Historical Analysis

Forestry in British and Post-British India A Historical Analysis Ramachandra Guha The current debate on the draft Forest Act has necessitated an examination of forest policies in India. This article, while analysing colonial and post-colonial forest policies, concentrates on the historical process whereby the traditionally-held rights of the forest communities have been progressive- ly curtailed through the development of forest policy, management and legislation.

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