ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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'Maruti Workers Are the Villains': Truth or Prejudice?

The events of 18 July in the Manesar plant of Maruti Suzuki which ended with the murder of a company manager were not a sudden confl agration. Anger at the plant had been building up for months over the management's refusal to recognise an elected union; workers were increasingly frustrated over their inability to exercise their constitutional rights and the demand of equal pay for equal work was falling on deaf ears. Rather than portray the workers as villains, managements in this industrial belt of Haryana have to ask themselves why they have not been able to develop a democratic industrial relations framework that can address the concerns of workers.

'Manesar Workers are the Villains': Truth or Prejudice?

The events of 18 July in the Manesar plant of Maruti Suzuki which ended with the murder of a manager were not a sudden conflagration. Anger at the plant had been building up for months over the management’s refusal to recognise an elected union; workers were increasingly frustrated over their inability to exercise their constitutional rights and the demand of equal pay for equal work was falling on deaf years. Rather than portray the workers as villains, managements in this industrial belt of Haryana have to ask themselves why they have not been able to develop a democratic industrial relations framework that can address the concerns of workers.

Gurgaon, July 25

The police action against the workers of Honda Motorcycles and Scooters India at Gurgaon on July 25 is consistent with the state's long-standing practice of providing an investor-friendly environment free of 'labour unrest'. However, contrary to official intent, this incident seems to have energised the unions and the labour movement.

Social Reproduction of Third World Labour in the Era of Globalisation

In the changed circumstances since the 1970s, it has become increasingly apparent that the capitalist system is unable to provide for the reproduction of its own labour force. Analyses of the welfare state have pointed out the crucial role played by state policy in shaping the maintenance and reproduction choices of labour through social welfare programmes, income distribution policies, and substitute wage programmes. However, in developing countries where most of the labour falls outside the purview of state-mandated programmes, the crucial role of the family in maintaining and reproducing labour became evident in stark manner. Focusing on the actual processes of the social reproduction of labour, and the strategies of survival that engage them can yield a more nuanced understanding of the multiple dimensions of insecurity faced by contemporary labour in different historical contexts and the various strategies of protection they devise.
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