ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Making Reforms Work for the Common People

The reforms of 1991 and 1996 were branded pro-rich as people with better initial endowments benefited disproportionately from the significant positive impacts, thus exacerbating both income and regional inequalities. This must change. Therefore, rather than minimising the role of the state as per the Washington Consensus, the presence of a development state is a necessary condition for implementing structural reforms in India.

Indian Exports

A time series of exports indicates that average export growth has remained almost stagnant since January 2012 after a sharp bounce back in the first and second quarters of 2009. This article looks at the composition of India's export basket, export destinations and share in global exports to understand the reasons for the fall in export growth. It concludes that the evident inability to increase India's share in global markets points to the need for a thorough review of the working and performance of export promotion councils and related export agencies.

Food Inflation: Contingent and Structural Factors

Food prices in the immediate future can be controlled only through large imports. Wheat stocks are adequate but rice stocks are not. There will be a fiscal cost because global prices are above domestic prices, but this will not be above 1 per cent of central government expenditure. This may be the best option since food inflation is now threatening to become generalised.

Rural Short-term Cooperative Credit Structure

This article critiques the package initiated by the government of India that aims at reviving the rural short-term cooperative credit structure in the country.

Nationalisation by Default

The nationalisation of the Indian coal industry was neither a well-planned nor a conscious socialist act of government policy. It was at best an act of crisis management. It was forced on the government by an industrial collapse resulting largely from government policies themselves. Post-nationalisation industrial development can hardly be said to have justified the social aims of nationalisation. Besides, nationalisation does not amount to socialism. The measure has served merely to strengthen the interests of state capitalism as such. It is difficult as yet to state, evidently, whether it has had the effect of serving the interests of the ruling classes in the country.

Nationalisation by Default The Case of Coal in India

Nationalisation by Default: The Case of Coal in India Rajiv Kumar The nationalisation of the Indian coal industry was neither a well-planned nor a conscious socialist act of government policy. It was at best an act in crisis management. It was forced on the government by an industrial collapse resulting largely from government policies themselves.
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