ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Recovering Key Strategic Concepts in India's Climate Policy

A reply to "Paris Agreement: Differentiation without Historical Responsibility?" by Kirit S Parikh and Jyoti K Parikh (EPW, 9 April 2016), which deepens the discussion on the key concepts of co-benefits and historical responsibility.

Closing the Policy Gap

Buildings have significant ecological footprint. But they could also be sources of energy savings. This potential of buildings, however, remains untapped. Andhra Pradesh is among the first Indian states to adopt a mandatory building energy policy. This paper analyses the reasons for the state's success. It argues that Andhra Pradesh's success owes to the state identifying the constraints of the sector's underlying institutional and technical arrangements, as opposed to following a top-down policymaking approach. These constraints were addressed during regulatory design through a participatory process involving state and non-state actors. As a result, local solutions have bridged the gap between existing structures and policy goals. In drawing from Andhra Pradesh's example, this paper offers lessons for ways to overcome the gridlock in building energy efficiency and the need to embed policy goals in their broader implementation context.

Towards Methodologies for Multiple Objective-Based Energy and Climate Policy

Planning for India's energy future requires addressing multiple and simultaneous economic, social and environmental challenges. While there has been conceptual progress towards harnessing their synergies, there are limited methodologies available for operationalising a multiple objective framework for development and climate policy. This paper proposes a "multi-criteria decision analysis" approach to this problem, using illustrative examples from the cooking and buildings sectors. An MCDA approach enables policy processes that are analytically rigorous, participative and transparent, which are required to address India's complex energy and climate challenges.

Neither Brake Nor Accelerator

What does India's Intended Nationally Determined Contribution imply for its approach to climate negotiations? And what implications does it have for domestic development choices? This article examines India's INDC through each lens, to understand the implied logic with regard to India's complex climate-development choices, and with regard to its strategic international choices. It finds that the INDC reflects, as yet, an inadequate consideration of the climate and development linkages that should inform India's actions. The contribution reflects a strategic choice to be "middle of the road," which neither disrupts the fragile diplomatic consensus nor creates pressure for more urgent global action.

Climate Change: India's Options

Climate change poses particularly difficult challenges for India. On the one hand, India does not want any constraints on its development prospects. On the other, it also wants to be seen as an emerging global power that requires a leadership role on key global issues like climate change. It can either approach climate change as a "stand alone" global negotiation, or, weave these negotiations into a "grand bargain" involving linkages with other international negotiations. In order to understand these issues better, a conference on climate change held in New Delhi in March 2009 focused on the different bargains India might have to strike, both domestically and internationally, to respond to these challenges. The papers presented here highlight some of the key issues raised in the conference and also the analysis and interpretation of the main points of discussion.
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