ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Pradeep AgrawalSubscribe to Pradeep Agrawal

Impact of the Reforms on Manufacturing Enterprises in the Delhi Region

The findings of a small sample survey of manufacturing enterprises in the Delhi region regarding perceptions of the impact of the economic reforms of 1990s show that most firms felt that the reforms helped them by increasing access to foreign technology and making imports of capital and intermediate goods cheaper.

China's Accession to WTO

This paper attempts to evaluate the implications of China's accession to the WTO in terms of its impact on the country's exports, imports and foreign investment inflows, and also discusses the likely effect of these developments for the Indian economy. The paper argues that in case of China, the changes consequent to accession to WTO will see an increase in economic activity, leading to a higher GDP growth rate. For India, the Chinese challenge can be met only if we strengthen the competitiveness of our economy further by undertaking additional reforms and improving infrastructure.

Improving India's Exports Improving India's Exports

India's garment and textile exports are likely to face fresh challenges with the phasing out of the Multi-Fibre Arrangement by 2005, as well as several regional trade treaties, such as NAFTA. Strong concerted policy action is needed, following up on the abolition of small-scale industry reservation for the garment sector, to enable it to grow rapidly and provide foreign exchange and employment in the Indian economy.

TRIPS and India's Pharmaceuticals Industry

Major changes can be expected in the Indian pharmaceuticals industry from 2005 due to the agreement on TRIPS, under which India will be required to introduce product patents for pharmaceutical products. This will likely lead to sharp increases in the prices of newly patented drugs. Although the TRIPS agreement may also lead to increased research on diseases common in developing countries, these benefits can be obtained in alternative ways, and without high costs. Thus, the TRIPS agreement is not in the national interest and should be renegotiated.

Lessons from Emerging Asia

disadvantages of more conventional anthropological categories that tend to bracket whole groups in terms of their forms of subsistence. But these rarely exist in a 'pure' state, nor are they unaffected by changes intrinsic to them.
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