ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Prabha KotiswaranSubscribe to Prabha Kotiswaran

What Is Wrong With India's Trafficking Bill 2018: An Introduction

​ The anti-trafficking discourse has seen a shift internationally in the last few decades. Where can India's Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection and Rehabilitation) Bill, which is to be tabled in the monsoon session of the Parliament, be located in this trajectory? This introduction to EPW Engage's special issue asserts that the Bill ignores the fast-changing international policy scene and India’s own rich indigenous approach to fighting labour trafficking. This article is a part of the Special Feature Rethinking Trafficking Bill 2018 . To read other articles in this feature, click here .

How Did We Get Here? Or A Short History of the 2018 Trafficking Bill

This essay tracks the development of the Indian anti-trafficking law over the past two decades culminating in the Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection and Rehabilitation) bill, 2018 (the Bill), proposed to be tabled in the Lok Sabha in the monsoon session of Parliament.

Author’s Response to Letter 'On Governance Feminism'

Contrary to Ratna Appnender’s claims, there is no confusion of fact or law in my article. Here is the passage she challenges: Although feminists ultimately lost out on crucial issues including marital rape, rape by the armed forces and the age of consent, their successes are not insubstantial and...

A Bittersweet Moment

Based on a mapping of Indian feminist interventions on the law of rape over the past three decades, culminating in the wide-ranging law reforms following the rape and murder of Jyoti Singh Pandey in December 2012, it is argued that Indian feminism displays key characteristics of governance feminism. In particular, Indian governance feminism is deeply committed to a highly gendered understanding of sexual violence. Further, Indian feminism has increasingly resorted to the use of the criminal law to address sexual violence even as its historical suspicion of postcolonial state power has reduced considerably and is now mostly evident in its opposition to the death penalty for rapists. A robust culture of state feminism has ensured that feminist ideas find a foothold in state institutions and indeed state laws. It is hoped that by demystifying feminists’ roles in law reform processes, we can begin to assess the intended and unintended consequences of such influence and resultant legislative successes.

A Battle Half-Won

The new legal strengthening of anti-trafficking provisions should be followed up by better implementation.
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