ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Corporate Investment in 1987-A Forecast

An attempt has been made in this paper to forecast the growth in private corporate investment in 1981. Corporate investment covered here includes gross capital expenditure of all companies in the private and joint sectors. The level and composition of corporate investment in 1986 are also presented BASED on the data available with the term- lending institutions on the expected phasing of capital expenditures of projects sanctioned assistance by them, forecasts of private corporate sector investment are being made annually since 1970. The methodology tor the forecast was developed by C Rangarajan and the same methodology is used for the present forecast of corporate investment during 1987. Details of the technique followed as well as limitations of this approach have been explained by C Rangarajan in his earlier writings.1 The forecast of corporate investment is based on the gross capital expenditures of all private and joint sector companies sanctioned assistance by the financial institutions. Besides a forecast for 1987, the study presents data on the composition and level of private corporate investment in 1986.

Corporate Investment in 1985-A Forecast

A Forecast Philip Thomas Ranjana Pendharkar attempt is made here to forecast the growth in private corporate investment in 1985. Corporate investment includes gross capital expenditure of all companies in the private and joint sectors. The study also sheds n the level and composition of corporate investment in 1984.

Corporate Investment in 1984-A Forecast

A Forecast Philip Thomas Ranjana Pendharkar This paper attempts to make a forecast of the growth in private corporate in vestment in 1984. Corporate investment here includes gross capital expenditure of all companies in the private and joint sectors.

Corporate Investment in 1983-A Forecast

A Forecast Philip Thomas Ranjana Pendharkar This paper attempts to make a forecast of the growth in private corporate investment in 1983. Corporate investment is taken to cover groan capital expenditures of all companies in the private mid joint sectors. The study also provides a picture of the level and composition of corporate investment in 1982.

External Conditions in Corporate Planning-Scanning, Analysis and Forecasting

Scanning, Analysis and Forecasting Philip Thomas This paper offers the following approach to the development of the environmental scanning, analysis and forecasting aspect of the corporate planning function: First, the concepts of 'relevance', 'systems' and 'theory of the business' are discussed. The operational consequences of these concepts are then described. Finally, the major kinds of information to be scanned are listed and the approaches used to analyse and forecast these major external forces are described.

Holding Companies for Government Enterprises-The Italian Experience

which is not widely known or appreciated abroad is the extent of State domination in the ownership and management of industrial undertakings and financial institutions in the country. Thus two large holding companies, the Industrial Reconstruction Institute (IRI) and the National Petrochemical Institute (ENI) own and manage between them hundreds of companies in the manufacturing and services sectors of the economy, accounting for a substantial part of national production, investment and employment. The extent of State ownership in the financial sector is seen not only in the dominant role of the Institute Mobiliare Italiano (IMI), the Government- owned term lending institution, but also in other term lending, banking and other financial institutions owned and controlled by the Industrial Reconstruction Institute (IRI). Among the companies controlled by IRl/ENI are also such internationally well known ones as Alitalia and Montecatini Edison.

Interest Rate Practices of Commercial Banks-Case for Official Regulation

Case for Official Regulation Philip Thomas Should banks be treated like other commercial undertakings and be allowed to settle their buying and selling prices under competitive conditions or should they be treated as a public utility whose pricing should be regulated ?

Import of Gold for Non-Monetary Purposes-A Comment

A Comment Philip Thomas September 3, 1966) is very interesting. There are, however, certain possible sources of error in Gulati's calculations. One such is his assumption that the proceeds of the sale of smuggled gold in India are all converted into foreign exchange at the official rate of exchange.
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