ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Paula BanerjeeSubscribe to Paula Banerjee

Criminalising the Trafficked

People-smuggling and trafficking in humans are generally viewed as two distinct offences. In general, smuggling involves delivering persons into the countries they wish to enter illegally and then leaving them to their own devices. Trafficking for sex and/or labour is defined as coercive in international discourses. In reality, the difference is largely semantic. Women smuggled into another country often fall prey to traffickers, and efforts to punish those who perpetrate the evil end up victimising the victims. Trafficking is not only an abuse of human rights, it is also a process that contributes to statelessness; a status that denies citizenship rights to the victims of trafficking and casts them in a permanent state of non-belonging, devoid of rights.

New Conundrums for Women in North-East India

This article examines how the women in Nagaland and Tripura negotiate with the government and the underground militant movement. Combating their vulnerability these women have created spaces to be heard by forging alliances with both sides. With their innovative responses, adapting to changing circumstances and situations, they have succeeded in changing the techniques of negotiation. Despite the countless obstacles they have to overcome, they continue to carry on these negotiations and wrest these spaces.

Indo-Bangladesh Cross-Border Migration and Trade

Almost all of the outstanding issues between India and Bangladesh continue to be related to disputes along the common border. The article puts forth a few suggestions for successful negotiation of the immigration problem which is also linked to the larger issue of enhanced sub-regional communication and trade.
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