ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Partap C AggarwalSubscribe to Partap C Aggarwal

Rehash of Old Ideas

Rehash of Old Ideas Partap C Aggarwal Social Change and Problems of Development in India by G R Madan; Allied Publishers, Bombay, 1971; pp viii + 134; Rs 15.

Impact of Green Revolution on Landless Labour-A Note

November 20, 1971 In terms of elasticities (mean), the quantity of current deposits increases by 0.75 per cent and 0.28 per cent as a consequence of a 1 per cent increase in national income and the number of scheduled commercial banking offices, respectively, and decreases by 0,27 per cent as a result of a 1 per cent increase in interest rate on 3-months' time deposits. The quantity of savings deposits increases by 1.63 per cent and 0.30 per cent as a result of a 1 per cent increase in national income and interest rate on savings deposits, respectively, and decreases by 0-15 per cent as a result of a 1 per cent in- crease in the interest rate on 3-months' time deposits. The quantity of fixed deposits increases by 1.59 per cent, 0 25 per cent, 0.86 per cent, and 0.10 per cent, as a consequence of a 1 per cent increase in national income, interest rate on 3-months' time deposits, maximum permissible interest rate on 3-months' time deposits, and the num- THE dictionary definition of the word "revolution" is abrupt and fundamental change. The phenomenon called Green Revolution has both these characteristics. For example, in less than a decade peasants in many parts of India have been transformed into farmers. They no longer carry on agriculture for subsistence with tools dating back three thousand years or more. Their aim now is her of scheduled commercial banking offices, respectively, and decreases by 0.82 per cent as a result of a 1 per cent increase in the yield on variable dividend industrial securities.

Islamic Revival in Modern India-The Case of the Meos

The Case of the Meos Partap C Aggarwal Till Independence, the Meos after whom the territory of Mewat is named, practised and were accepted as high caste kshatriyas. Since 1947, there has been a vigorous Islamic movement among them. The Hindus no longer regard them as kshatriyas and they themselves are becoming 'full' Muslims.

Changing Religious Practices-Their Relationship to Secular Power in a Rajasthan Village

Their Relationship to Secular Power in a Rajasthan Village Partap C Aggarwal Power, not religion, maintains caste hierarchy. In the Mewat village studied by (he author, those castes which were previously deprived of economic and political power and which subsequently were in a position to become strong, recognised the opportunity and acted with speed and determination. In order to make this gain secure, they began to emulate the religious behaviour of the higher castes.

A Muslim Sub-Caste of North India

For nearly five centuries the Meos, a dominant land-owning sub-caste of Mewat in Rajasthan, enjoyed the privileges available to both Hindus and Muslims. By continuing to follow their original Hindu tradition they maintained their dominant land-owning position in the Hindu caste structure. At the same time they protected themselves from the wrath of powerful Muslim rulers by nominal adoption of Islam. In recent years, however, gradual break-up of the Jajmani arrangements and a tendency of the subcastes towards wider integration has made it necessary for the Meos also to change. Because partition stiffened the attitude of Hindus towards them, the Meos were virtually forced into greater Islamization in order to participate in the widening contacts.
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