ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles by P S VijayshankarSubscribe to P S Vijayshankar

Water and Agricultural Transformation in India

An argument for twin propositions is presented in this two-part paper: (i) that solving India’s water problem requires a paradigm shift in agriculture (Part I), and (ii) that the crisis in Indian agriculture cannot be resolved without a paradigm shift in water management and governance (Part II). The second part describes the paradigm shift needed in water, which includes rejuvenation of catchment areas of rivers, a shift towards participatory approaches to water management, focus on green water and protective irrigation, and widespread adoption of water-saving seeds and technologies, while building transdisciplinarity and overcoming hydro-schizophrenia in water governance.

Water and Agricultural Transformation in India

An argument for twin propositions is presented in this two-part paper: (i) that solving India’s water problem requires a paradigm shift in agriculture (Part I), and (ii) that the crisis in Indian agriculture cannot be resolved without a paradigm shift in water management and governance (Part II). If farming takes up 90% of India’s water and just three water-intensive crops continue to use 80% of agricultural water, the basic water needs of millions of people, for drinking water or protective irrigation, cannot be met. This first part argues that the paradigm shift in agriculture requires a shift in cropping patterns suited to each agroecological region, a movement from monoculture to polycultural crop biodiversity, a decisive move towards agroecological farming, and greater emphasis on soil rejuvenation.

All Is Not Lost, But Water Sector Reforms Must Go Ahead

There is a growing awareness that water endowments in India are severely under the threat of exhaustion and degradation. The focus since independence has been on intensifying utilisation of water through building more and more dams on rivers or extracting groundwater through wells and tube wells...

More on Participatory Aquifer Mapping

Apropos of the letter “Dangers in Participatory Aquifer Mapping” (16 February 2013), it is important to understand the background regarding the groundwater crisis in India. Eshwer Kale cautions us about the need to think about participatory aquifer mapping and regulation before rolling these out on...

Understanding Agricultural Commodity Markets

In recent years, agricultural markets in India have grown in size and complexity, not only in terms of volumes and commodities traded but also in terms of regulatory reforms and a proliferation of new marketing channels and arrangements, with new and evolving roles played by both state and private players. A new generation of theoretically-grounded empirical research is urgently needed to make sense of these rapidly changing agricultural markets and their linkages. Such a renewed agenda, moreover, must both build systematically on the insights of previous work and engage with the new and emerging features and forces shaping diverse commodity markets and regions. The papers in this special issue make a small contribution in this direction.
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