ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

P Parthasarathy RaoSubscribe to P Parthasarathy Rao

Sorghum and Pearl Millet Economy of India

Coarse cereals such as pearl millet and sorghum, the hardiest and least risky cereals, are mainly grown in India's arid and semi-arid regions. These crops possess high nutritive and fodder value and are primarily consumed by their producers. On the supply side, there has been a large shift in the area under cultivation to rice and wheat and other commercial crops. On the demand side, the distribution of rice and wheat at subsidised prices through the public distribution system has led to a fall in the consumption of sorghum and millets. The decline in cultivated area could result in a problem for the livestock sector in many regions. It is crucial that the sorghum and millet sector be supported by strong government policies and programmes for food, fodder, and better nutrition through value addition and demand creation.

Diversification towards High Value Agriculture

During the last several years diversification of agriculture in India towards high value commodities, i e, fruits, vegetables and livestock products, has been proceeding at a fast pace and is reflected in the high share of HVCs in agricultural production in a number of districts. This paper builds on the hypothesis that access to markets, defined in terms of demand for HVCs and the factors facilitating their transport from production sites to consumption centres, is critical to their growth. The analysis thus brings out regional variations in HVCs across the country that have implications for regional agricultural planning and consequently for public and private sector investment strategies.

Rainfed Agriculture Typology in India

T G Kelley M Jayawant P Parthasarathy Rao This article reports a study to develop a rainfed agriculture typology for the dryland arid and semi-arid tropics (SAT) of India by using the predominant crops in the districts as a key integrator variable.

Chickpea Competitiveness in India

Chickpea's competitive position in India has changed during the last 20 years, resulting in a shift in the centre of chickpea production away from the traditional growing region in the north. This paper estimates national and regional trends in chickpea crop area, identifies factors underlying these trends, and assesses the demand and regional supply prospects to the year 2000.
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