ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Stand with JNU-I: Journalists from JNU

Below are extracts from statements issued by a few groups from all over the world on the events that happened in Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, since 10 February.

(i) Journalists from JNU

Statement of Social Scientists

We, as social scientists, scholars, teachers and concerned citizens, feel extremely concerned about the lynching at Dadri, and the murders of scholars and thinkers like M M Kalaburgi, Narendra Dabholkar, Govind Pansare and others, and wish to register our strong protest.

Statement of Historians

Concerned at the highly vitiated atmosphere prevailing in the country, characterised by various forms of intolerance, we, as academic historians and as responsible citizens of a democracy that has greatly valued its inherited traditions of tolerance, wish to express our anguish and protest about

Statement of Artists

The artist community of India stands in firm solidarity with the actions of our writers who have relinquished awards and positions, and spoken up in protest against the alarming rise of intolerance in the country.

Statement of Scientists

The scientific community is deeply concerned with the climate of intolerance, and the ways in which science and reason are being eroded in the country.

Public Report on Health

A bottom-up view of the health conditions and services in six states - three performing and three not-so-well performing ones - was arrived at through a study by a multidisciplinary team with varied experiences in health research. This paper presents the results of a Public Report on Health that was initiated in 2005 to understand public health issues for people from diverse backgrounds living in different region-specific contexts. The findings, which have policy implications, have been used to analyse the ongoing official attempts to deal with the various challenges thrown up by the National Rural Health Mission.

Negotiating Trade-offs

Exploring the prospects of the ecosystem services approach for natural resource management and poverty alleviation in India, this paper points out that it is vital to have an understanding of the political economy of negotiations over natural resource use. An appreciation of the synergies and trade-offs between ecosystem services is equally important to develop better strategies for pro-poor ecosystem management. If the distributional outcomes associated with alternative options for natural resource management are neglected, there is a risk that such interventions may fail because of resistance from those who are excluded or those who stand to lose.

Thailand's Universal Health Coverage Scheme

Thailand achieved universal health coverage by 2002 with three public health insurance schemes covering the entire population. Of these, the Social Health Insurance scheme for private sector employees has been run on a capitation contract model since 1991. The Universal Coverage Scheme followed its example, with capitation payments for outpatient services and a global budget with diagnosis-related group-based payments for inpatient care. There are several arguments in favour of this closed-end payment system such as administrative simplicity, efficiency, prevention of supplier-induced demand and long-term cost containment.

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