ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By Neetu Choudhary

Global Hunger Index 2022

At first, the arguments put forward by the government to question India’s GHI 2022 ranking appear technically valid. However, being founded on narrow conceptual considerations, they are insufficient to defend India’s position. While India’s GHI ranking is affected also by the performance of other countries, the GHI score shows consistent deterioration since 2015, except in 2020. A preliminary assessment of data indicates that India’s GHI ranking should not be seen in isolation and instead is likely a manifestation of absolute increase in urban hunger.

COVID-19 as an Opportunity to Engage with Urban Malnutrition Challenge: Preliminary Insights from India

As the world is urbanising fast, a growing body of literature highlights malnutrition as an imminent urban challenge, further compounded by the outbreak of COVID-19. The nutrition policy discourse, however, is yet to accommodate this shift. In fact, it continues to exhibit a rural bias. This itself has partly been reinforced by the absence of authoritative evidence on urban malnutrition. Based on preliminary analysis of Indian data, this paper examines whether there is urbanisation of child malnutrition. The paper finds that urban India is witnessing a decline in nutrition advantage. While for less urbanised states, urban child stunting is relatively higher, in more urbanised states, urban child wasting is a challenge. Given that wasting is an indicator of acute malnutrition, it is partly attributable to lack of adequate food. Though it might be early to connect this to a looming hunger crisis, growing child wasting questions the claims of food security in urban India. Seeing this further in context of implications of COVID-19 provides a potential basis for broadening of the nutrition policy agenda.

Deciphering the Indian Slip on the Global Hunger Index 2021

The Indian slip on the Global Hunger Index 2021 is being attributed by the government to the alleged methodological discrepancies involved in constructing the GHI. This article, to begin with, counters the government’s argument defending India’s position on the GHI. It further finds that India likely has been undergoing a decline in food security since the mid-2000s itself. The trend is corroborated from the 2019–20 data available for selected states. Though COVID-19 has compounded the food insecurity challenges, India’s position on the GHI cannot be attributed to the pandemic alone. Rather, it reflects a trend that India has been experiencing for sometime now.

 

Simmering with Gender Violence: Does Kerala Call for Revisiting Empowerment?

Existing literature lays much emphasis on the role of women’s economic and educational progress in attaining gender equality and empowerment. This presumption appears to be contradictory when situated in context of recent evidence on growing violence against women in Kerala, highlighting the significance of women’s agency in the process of empowerment. 

India’s Slip on Global Hunger Index

After witnessing an improvement from 2008 to 2014, India’s rank on Global Hunger Index slipped in 2016. This slip is attributed to reformulation of GHI to encompass the multidimensional character of malnutrition, wherein underweight was replaced by stunting and wasting. While GHI scores of several other countries witnessed a decline, India fared worse. This is explained through a stickiness in child stunting levels in India attributed to gendered norms, poor sanitation, and high regional concentration.

Indo-Nepal Economic Cooperation through Bihar

Bihar shares a large part of its border with Nepal, including 10 trade transit points for Indo-Nepal trade. There is much potential for economic gains towards which India and the state of Bihar can cooperate with Nepal within the mutually agreed formal framework. The region has a locational advantage that bestows natural interdependence, which is yet to be utilised. There is a need to shift from bilateralism to subregionalism as far as South Asian regional cooperation is concerned.

Gender, Work and Household Food Security

Women's role in food security may have earned acknowledgement, but there is no measure of how much and in what ways women actually contribute to household food security. The absence of a suitable methodology of assessment means that not only does their contribution remain vague but there is also a lack of solid data to draw policy inferences in terms of operationalisation of food security and women's empowerment. This article, based on research conducted in two villages in Nanded, Maharashtra, seeks to quantify women's contribution to household food security. Through investigation into the time-use pattern of women's activities, it also arrives at a method to estimate how much women contribute to security with their visible and invisible work.