ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles By N D Jayaprakash

The Game of Disarming the Unarmed: The Other Side of ‘Solution Aversion’

The proponents of the “Prohibition Treaty” are under the delusion that one by one each of the NWS would unilaterally decide to eliminate its stockpile of nuclear weapons and become a signatory to the treaty. However, the truth is there is not an iota of hope that any of the present nine nuclear weapon states would unilaterally disarm; the perverse logic of nuclear deterrence precludes any such possibility. Nuclear risk reduction, gradual diminution, and ultimate elimination of nuclear weapons are step by step processes. They are achievable only through mutually beneficial bilateral and multilateral agreements that are enforceable and verifiable.

Conning Humanity in the Name of Disarmament

One of the biggest failures of the United Nations since its founding has been its inability to halt the nuclear arms race and take any significant step towards elimination of nuclear weapons. On the contrary, the UN—wittingly or unwittingly—became a victim of a series of con games played by the nuclear weapon states. On the face of it, the latest attempt of the UN to adopt a so-called Convention on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons appears to be no different. India’s decision to stay away from the proceedings is shocking since it has historically supported the cause of disarmament. 

Conning Humanity in the Name of Disarmament

One of the biggest failures of the United Nations since its founding has been its inability to halt the nuclear arms race and take any significant step towards elimination of nuclear weapons. On the contrary, the —wittingly or unwittingly—became a victim of a series of con games played by the nuclear weapon states. On the face of it, the latest attempt of the to adopt a so-called Convention on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons appears to be no different. India’s decision to stay away from the proceedings is shocking since it has historically supported the cause of disarmament. New Delhi is defending a world divided into nuclear-haves and nuclear-have-nots unmindful of the disastrous consequences.

Supreme Court's Judgment on Koodankulam Worrying Omissions

The Supreme Court of India has not yet granted permission for commissioning the Koodankulam nuclear power plant in Tamil Nadu, as its judgment on 6 May 2013 makes obvious. But unfortunately it does not seem to have paid serious attention to concerns raised by the former chairperson of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, among others, on the quality of components provided by the Russian supplier. It also does not appear to have had the opportunity to ponder over the fi ndings of the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission, which was forthright in its view that the Fukushima disaster was man-made.

The Bhopal Disaster and Medical Research

The Supreme Court, in its fi nal order of October 1991, upheld the compensation settlement with Union Carbide which made the Government of India liable for any shortfall in compensation or any new claims from the Bhopal gas victims. Following this order the Indian Council of Medical Research disbanded its medical esearch on the long-term medical effects of the disaster. A recent Supreme Court order directs the ICMR to resume that research, but the question that looms is why the ICMR abdicated its ethical mandate and allowed its subordination to a political diktat. Why did the ICMR as aninstitution allow itself to become an apologist of the Indian state?

Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty: The 'Greatest Con Game'

Forty years have passed since the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty was signed. Some self-defeating clauses in the treaty have only militated against the aim of global disarmament and it is clear that the NPT as a treaty that was proposed by the major powers has turned out to be a con game. The discriminatory treaty has neither resulted in substantial disarmament nor has it helped to curb nuclear proliferation, either horizontal (which it was supposed to) or vertical (which was given short shrift in the original treaty).

Winnable Nuclear War?

The shrill rhetoric emanating from responsible quarters about using 'any and every weapon' to win the war against terrorism appears to be blind and deaf to the consequences of such an engagement. One way of getting out of the present quagmire is for India and Pakistan to first bilaterally put into practice the expressed desire of both India and Pakistan to persuade all nuclear weapon states to initiate steps for reducing the nuclear danger. This was the core of the UN resolution passed at the India's initiative with full support of Pakistan in 1998 and adopted by the UN General Assembly in October 2000.