ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Mudasir AminSubscribe to Mudasir Amin

From Agenda of Alliance to Agenda of Split

The upping of the anti-militancy operations following the break-up of the Peoples Democratic Party–Bharatiya Janata Party alliance in Jammu and Kashmir is seen as being carried out with a view to win the general elections at the cost of Kashmiri lives and bodies scarred with pellets. Mudasir Amin...

Politicising the Street

​ As the Kashmir conflict entered a low-intensity armed phase and saw greater street protest in the 2000s, new expressions of political dissidence have emerged in the Valley. Political graffiti has found resonance, across urban and rural areas, as a form of resistance against state narratives whilst also shielding participants from direct persecution. After initial concessions, the state has now begun to respond with counter-graffiti.

Co-option, Collaboration, Conflict

The Peoples Democratic Party and the Bharatiya Janata Party coalition government in Jammu and Kashmir has been marred by doublespeak and U-turns vis-à-vis its poll/alliance mandate, gross human rights violations, and extended (cyber) curfews in the Valley. With Kashmiri youth turning to insurgency in a big way, rising mass protests, and repeated cancellation of local elections, the government and indeed democracy itself face a legitimacy crisis.

Civil Society and State in Armed Conflict

Civil society plays a significant role in challenging, limiting or contesting state power. In a conflict zone like Kashmir, where the state in the guise of counter-insurgency operations violates the human rights of civilians with impunity, civil society is in direct confrontation with the state. This article discusses the evolution of civil society organisations in Kashmir, their role in the history of resistance, and their struggle to defend human rights in a repressive environment, where legal and extralegal methods are employed to co-opt them or intimidate them into silence.

Crimes against Humanity

A report by the Jammu Kashmir Coalition of Civil Society records the egregious violations of the human rights of people in Kashmir by the security forces. However, it goes further than previous such reports by looking at the structures of violence where individual perpetrators are viewed as agents of violence in the larger occupational structure.
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