ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Mohinder SinghSubscribe to Mohinder Singh

Tagore on Modernity, Nationalism and ‘the Surplus in Man’

Rabindranath Tagore’s reflections on the concepts and practices of civilisation, nationalism, and community are directly concerned with the nature of modern political power and its underlying assumptions about human life. This article interprets these reflections by reading them along with and in the light of his philosophical anthropology as articulated in a variety of philosophical essays, focusing closely on The Religion of Man. It concludes by underscoring the contemporary import of these reflections as a philosophical resource for thinking about possibilities of human communities that go beyond the way the dominant tendency in political power tends to capture human life under its multiple regimes.

Khalistan Sense and Nonsense

fortunately, the University's contribution in the exploration of Kashmir's problems and exploitation of the Valley's great research potential has been marginal. This University has been an outpost of retiring faculty at Aligarh Muslim University who have often used the time they spend there merely to carry their own previous concerns, academic or other, to the University. Perhaps, there would have been some development of research on subjects of direct concern and relevance to Kashmir at the University if there had either been enough Kashmiri scholars or scholars directly interested in Kashmir on its faculty. It is hoped that where concern with research has been limited on the part of the ICSSR and the retiring faculty of AMU who man the University at Srinagar, the Kashmir government would take the initiative to encourage research on the Valley from different disciplinary perspectives. Kashmir is fertile ground for the social scientist and every aspect of its life, as Mohammad Ishaq Khan indeed sug- gests in this book, is crying out for exploration and research.
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