ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Meera SamsonSubscribe to Meera Samson

Expanding the School Market in India: Parental Choice and the Reproduction of Social Inequality

Since the 1990s, private providers have made a significant contribution to increasing the size of the schooling marketplace. However, qualitative data collected as part of the probe Revisited survey in 2006-07 reveals that the expanded school market has become a new locus along which existing social inequalities are being reproduced and entrenched. An analysis of the dynamics of schooling choice in a village in Rajasthan attempts to answer the following questions. One, what determines schooling choice? Two, what is the relationship between the expanded school market and schooling quality within and between government and private schools? The paper thus provides a rich and detailed account of how an expanded school market changes the institutional culture within which parents make decisions about schooling and how education is affecting patterns of social disadvantage.

Under the Shadow of Shanno's Death

The death of 11-year-old Shanno Khan in April reportedly because of the punishment given by her teacher in a municipal school in New Delhi was a shock but should not have been a surprise. A study conducted in 2001 on schooling in Delhi for the 11-18 year age group showed that violence and negligence are very much a part of the educational experience of Delhi's schoolchildren.

Private Schools for Less Privileged

The 1990s saw a surge in parental demand for education which prompted a new phenomenon, the growth of small fee-charging private schools for the less privileged. While this development has been welcomed by education bureaucrats, there has been little research on these schools, which often because they remained 'unrecognised' even missed statistical surveys. This paper reports a small field study of these schools in one district each in Haryana, Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan.
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