ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Manabendu ChattopadhyaySubscribe to Manabendu Chattopadhyay

Tenancy Inefficiency

While several attempts have been made to explain the inefficiencies of sharecropping systems found in developing economics, they have been marked by certain definitional flaws. A more rigorous analysis of sharecropping that incorporates 'size-class' differences among owners and tenants thus becomes necessary. Earlier studies had also stressed on land productivity and intensity of farm resource utilisation as indicators of efficiency, but they are seen as measures of relative efficiency only under restrictive assumptions. This study stresses on the availability of irrigation resources as a factor that increases efficiency - for both owners and tenants.

Farm Size and Productivity

Farm Size and Productivity Manabendu Chattopadhyay Atanu Sengupta IN a recent polemic directed against our paper

Farm Efficiency under Cobb-Douglas Production Technology

Production Technology Introduction IN earlier communications to this journal Dey and Rudra (1973 a, b) presented some results based on farm-level data of Farm Management Survey of West Bengal of a test carried out for the hypothesis of al locative efficiency of fanners under the assumption of Cobb-Douglas technology.' The authors considered the production function connecting value of output (O) with two input variables defined as labour input (L) and material inputs (M) both for crops taken individually and for crops taken together. They studied empirically the relation between the pairs of variables (M L and O) and found that there is a strong association between the pairs of variables for all crops and no association for individual crops. The lack of association between the variables for individual crops with the derived test results prompted them to conclude that the hypothesis of allocative efficiency of farmers gets rejected at least in the case of West Bengal irrespective of any production technology. The aim here is to examine the same allocative efficiency hypothesis in the same region after a period of about 18 years. During this period, some authors argue that a transformation of West Bengal agrarian economy has taken place in terms of its changes in production of major crops. This has been possible partly due to the widespread use of modern agricultural inputs and partly due to the institutional changes that occurred for the implement ation of land reform programme and the establishment of the three-tier panchayat system in the 1980s in rural West Bengal [Saha and Swaminathan 1994]. It will be interesting to examine the efficacy of alio- cative efficiency model under the changing conditions of West Bengal agriculture.

Farm Size and Productivity-A New Look at the Old Debate

A New Look at the Old Debate The authors' study, using farm-level disaggregated data for 1989-90 for West Bengal suggests that the inverse relationship between farm size and productivity becomes stronger in the agriculturally developed regions of West Bengal compared to the relatively less developed regions. This is possibly due to the effects of green revolution on smaller sized farms. However, to arrive at a comprehensive view of the phenomenon discussed in this paper, more studies using disaggregated farm-level data for different states are required.

Trends in Level of Living in Urban India

Pradip Maiti Manabendu Chattopadhyay With reference to urban India, this paper examines how absolute levels of living of different groups of the population have been changing over time and whether disparity in levels of living across different groups has worsened Also examined is the incidence of urban poverty over a long period spanning almost four decades.

Ashok Rudra s Contribution to Indian Agricultural Economics

Indian Agricultural Economics Manabendu Chattopadhyay Ashok Rudra's basic approach to agricultural economics was to expose the limitations of the neoclassical framework in studying production conditions and relations of production in Indian agriculture.

Structural Change in Composition of Foodgrains Production

Foodgrains Production THERE arc some propositions in our empirical literature regarding the performance of foodgrains production in Indian agriculture:

How Do the Poor Survive

Nikhilesh Bhattacharya Prafulla Chakraborty Manabendu Chattopadhyay Ashok Rudra There is no doubt that a very large part of the Indian population is so poor as not to be able to procure the minimum nourishment. How then do these people continue to survive?

Disparities in Income and Level of Living

This is the sixth and last paper in the series reporting the results of a sample survey conducted in the Calcutta Municipal Corporation area to examine the extent of interand intra-occupational differences in income and level of living of employees in a variety of public and private sector agencies. This paper analyses the inter-employer variations as well as the inter-occupational differences for all the employers taken together. It also summarises the empirical findings of the entire series.

Disparities in Service Conditions and Fringe Benefits

Workers in many organisations are allowed various allowances and perquisites which are not always taken into account in discussions about disparities in income earnings among different groups of workers. Such benefits however have considerable impact on the level of well-being of workers concerned and the differences in them cause further distortions in the distribution of income earnings.

Inter and Intra Occupational Differences in Income and Level of Living

Using a sample of private sector employees in Calcutta the authors analyse the nature and extent of differences in income, service conditions and levels of living across occupational groups. This is the fourth in a series of articles aimed at analysing interand intra-occupational differences in income and standard of living.

Inter and Intra Occupational Differences in Income and Level of Living

Using a sample of West Bengal state employees the authors analyse the nature and extent of differences in income, service conditions and levels of living across occupational groups. This is the third in a series of articles aimed at analysing interand intra-occupational differences in income and standard of living.

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