ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Mala RamanathanSubscribe to Mala Ramanathan

Social Choice and Political Economy of Health

The National Health Policy, 2017 can be credited for an alternative vision towards the development of the health sector in India, but it falls short of expectations on certain counts. The core idea of strategic purchasing from the private sector is relevant, but can be incompatible with the existence of a robust public sector, particularly when reforms for enhancing the competitiveness of the public sector are undermined. Thus, the NHP essentially reopens the fundamental debate regarding the role of social choice mechanisms while deciding upon policy instruments and desirable outcomes. This has profound implications for the political economy of the health sector and can unintentionally catapult health as a salient feature in electoral politics.

Reproductive Health Index- Measuring Reproduction or Reproductive Health

small pox. It is only one step from that to migration to Delhi. In Delhi, the immigrant Bihari student is often a stranger to the globalised elite and the metropolitan mode that shape what passes as culture in the nation's capital city. Besides, the social arrogance of the locals' many of whom are themselves refugees from Pakistan and elsewhere - vis-a-vis the more recent immigrants is a fact of Delhi's life. Thus, the Bihari students who are derisively called 'Harrys' and even sometimes 'Harias' if their accent is particularly marked, are uncomfortable for years in the capital city of the country whose one citizen out of every 10 is from 'Harrysburg'. The situation of girl students is particularly bad. Despite protestations of equal opportunity and gender equality, Delhi University has not thought it fit to provide anywhere near adequate hostels for girl students. As such, thousands of girls have to live in poky little holes made available by rapacious landlords in the areas around the university. And, the only silver lining in their clouded existence is the sense of freedom that they get in Delhi, away from the 'feudal' constraints and traditional orthodoxies of their homes.
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