ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Madhu KishwarSubscribe to Madhu Kishwar

Why Fear People's Choice?

Despite reservations about the jurisdiction and value of plebiscites, the author argues that the only way for India to get out of the current stalemate on the issue of Jammu and Kashmir is to grab the bull by the horns and stop fighting a defensive battle on the issue of plebiscite. Instead of being blackmailed and terrorised at being reminded of this reneged commitment, India should be actively working towards a carefully redefined plebiscite.

Women and Politics Beyond Quotas

Given that the marginalisation of women is integrally linked to the marginalisation of all decent people from our party politics, we need wide-spectrum electoral reforms that will curb the role of muscle and money power in politics and democratise decision-making in the political parties and a sensible proportional representation system which facilitates representation of various marginalised groups without mechanical reservation quotas.

Codified Hindu Law-Myth and Reality

There is almost no principle introduced by the Hindu personal code which did not already exist somewhere in India as accepted law. On the other hand, there were several existing, much more liberal principles which were decimated by the Hindu Code, In their determination to put an end to the growth of custom, the reformers were putting an end to the essence of Hindu law; but they persisted in calling their codification 'Hindu'.

Continuing the Dowry Debate

read C S Lakshmi's (EPW, January 28 and May 13) and Rajni Palriwala's (April 29) rejoinders to my article 'Rethinking Dowry Boycott' in Manushi (No 48, 1988) may not have read the original article. The rejoinders have seriously misrepresented my position. To begin with, my article must be read in the context of Manushi's ten-year long engagement with the questions of dowry and marital violence, and my earlier articles on these issues, particularly 'Dowry

Violence on Gurpurab in Jammu and Its Aftermath

and Its Aftermath Madhu Kishwar Smitu Kothari The lesson of the communal riots in Jammu in mid-January is that even when relations between communal groups have been cordial for generations, serious trouble can break out due to the special interests of small groups and the abdication of responsibility by the administration and the political leadership. This is a grim lesson for the whole country.

Dowry and Inheritance Rights

Dowry and Inheritance Rights Madhu Kishwar IT is puzzling that EPW should think fit to publish such a confused diatribe as C S Lakshmi's 'On Kidneys and Dowry' (January 28).

Toiling without Rights. Ho Women of Singhbhum

While the role of unequal land rights in determining the status of different caste and class groups in India has been the subject of much debate, their impact on women's status has generally escaped attention. In fact the patriarchal bias of the social and the legal system gives rise to the assumption that once the men of the family have land, the women's needs are automatically taken care of This study attempts to place the issue of the denial of land rights to Ho tribal women in the context of women's daily lives, work, struggle for survival and status in the family and community This is the final part of the paper which has been published in three parts.

Toiling without Rights Ho Women of Singhbhum

While the role of unequal land rights in determining the status of different caste and class groups in India has been the subject of much debate, their impact on women's status has generally escaped attention. In fact the patriarchal bias of the social and the legal system gives rise to the assumption that once the men of the family have land, the women's needs are automatically taken care of This study attempts to place the issue of the denial of land rights to Ho tribal women in the context of women's daily lives, work, struggle for survival and status in the family and community.

Toiling without Rights Ho Women of Singhbhum

Singhbhum Madhu Kishwar While the role of unequal land rights in determining the status of different caste and class groups in India has been the subject of much debate, their impact on women's status has generally escaped attention. In fact the patriarchal bias of the social and the legal system gives rise to the assumption that once the men of the family have land, the women's needs are automatically taken care of This study attempts to place the issue of the denial of land rights to Ho tribal women in the context of women's daily lives, work, struggle for survival and status in the family and community The paper is being published in three parts.

Arya Samaj and Women s Education-Kanya Mahavidyalaya, Jalandhar

Kanya Mahavidyalaya, Jalandhar Madhu Kishwar The Kanya Mahavidyalaya in Jalandhar was set up in the 1890s in response to the need to impart to women a special kind of education which would enable them to adapt themselves to the new demands made by the educated men of the family without losing their cultural moorings. It was one of the most successful experiments of its kind as well as the most daring and radical in its innovativeness. Its founder, Lala Devaraj an Arya Samajist and his supporters most of whom were women, faced criticism and attack from conservative opinion both inside and outside the Samaj. The battles they fought and the way the internal contradictions in the Arya Samaj theory and practice were resolved are significant because they are typical of the legacy inherited by women's education today from its nineteenth century beginnings.

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