ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

M Suresh BabuSubscribe to M Suresh Babu

The Politics of Urban Mega-projects in India

Mega infrastructure projects such as industrial parks and special economic zones are increasingly seen as a means to jump-start urban economies in India. This paper contributes to understanding the politics of urban mega-projects by examining the quality of local economic linkages of an information technology park, located in what is popularly referred to as the "IT corridor" in Chennai. Based on a survey of employees in software firms and support services for IT parks along the corridor, the paper maps patterns of employment creation, new consumption and mobility patterns of those employed in the IT parks and implications for the quality of urban development.

Fiscal Sustainability of Tamil Nadu

The paper by Elena Ianchovichina et al (December 29, 2007) presented a framework for subnational fiscal sustainability analysis and applied it to Tamil Nadu. However, the empirical application presented is unclear and so raises doubts on the veracity of their projections of the future. The recent trends in the state's fiscal situation do not corroborate their analysis and conclusions.

Trends in Savings, Investment and Consumption

This article reviews the quick estimates of savings, investment and consumption released by the Central Statistical Organisation in the National Accounts Statistics 2007. It is clear that both savings and investment have risen sharply in the past two years, but there remain some concerns about the trends.

Kerala's Growth Trajectory

M SURESH BABU Recent discussions on the growth ex-perience of Kerala have evoked considerable interest among development economists. Two papers portraying Kerala

Growth and Distribution in Indian Industry in the Nineties

In a study of the evolution of the Indian manufacturing sector over close to three decades we find the annual average rate of growth in the nineties to have risen almost across the board at the two-digit level of industry. Nevertheless, the acceleration is not particularly impressive for what is often hailed as the most significant policy-regime shift since 1950. There is a hefty rise in investment, however, though without a corresponding increase in its efficiency. And distribution has shifted sharply with labour's share declining. This paper attempts to link these developments in a coherent way.

World Bank-CII Study on Competitiveness

The study should be seen as one of the first attempts to define and legitimise the second generation of economic reforms. However, the narrow definition of 'investment climate' employed in the study excludes several important factors that govern competitiveness, such as social infrastructure.

Trade Liberalisation and Productivity Growth in Manufacturing

Using panel data comprising firm-level information drawn from groups within manufacturing industry which have experienced the most significant tariff reduction, this study investigates the trend in productivity growth since 1988-89. The sample of 2,300 firms and 11,009 observations, spanning the period 1988-89 to 1997-98 is very likely the largest assembled for the purpose thus far. We find no evidence of acceleration in productivity growth since the onset of reforms in 1991-92. The result is evaluated in relation to the changes till date in the policy regime in the Indian economy.

Liberalisation, Productivity and Competition-The Missing Links

Liberalisation, Productivity and Competition: A Panel Study of Indian Manufacturing by V Srivastava; Oxford University Press, 1996. PRODUCTIVITY, the main source of modern economic growth, has once again been discussed and debated in India in the context of recent economic reforms. With productivity growth and increasing competitiveness becoming the key issues in the industrial reform process, measurement of total factor productivity (TFP) has become a growing industry by itself. Different data sets and methodologies have been tried out culminating in the debate over the growth of TFP in the 1980s. In this brief review, we highlight some of the contentious issues emerging from the latest addition by Srivastava to this ever growing literature. We divide this review into two sections. A synopsis of the book is presented in section I. In section 2, the major micro-level findings of the study are compared and contrasted with the macro-level data in order to bring out areas for future research.
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