ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Addressing Loss and Damage from Climate Change Impacts

The 21st Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, to be held in Paris from 30 November 2015 to 11 December 2015, will need to resolve several long-standing issues pertaining to climate-induced loss and damage. This article lists the key issues relating to loss and damage. It then evaluates the potential for and limits of legal claims relating to loss and damage in general international law so as to contextualise their treatment in the climate negotiations.

'Lima Call to Climate Action'

The United Nations climate talks in Lima, Peru, were important as the last preparatory meet ahead of the Paris talks in late 2015, where a new global agreement to combat climate change is to be negotiated. While few would characterise the "Lima Call to Climate Action" as a resounding success, given the deep differences that plague the climate negotiations, the Lima call represents progress and will stand countries in good stead as the drum roll for Paris begins.

'Lima Call to Climate Action'

The United Nations climate talks in Lima, Peru, were important as the last preparatory meet ahead of the Paris talks in late 2015, where a new global agreement to combat climate change is to be negotiated. While few would characterise the "Lima Call to Climate Action" as a resounding success, given the deep differences that plague the climate negotiations, the Lima call represents progress and will stand countries in good stead as the drum roll for Paris begins.

The Copenhagen Agreed Outcome: Form, Shape and Influence

This article explores first, why a legally binding instrument is unlikely to emerge from the UN conference on climate change at Copenhagen, and next, whether it matters and if so, why. In the process, it examines the terms "politically binding", and "legally binding", and explores the space between and within politically and legally binding agreements. It also discusses the form and shape that a political deal could take at Copenhagen, and the influence it could have in the development of a future climate regime.

'Cloud' over Climate Negotiations: From Bangkok to Copenhagen and Beyond

After months of incremental progress on negotiating text for the United Nations summit on climate change in Copenhagen in December, recent talks in Bangkok unearthed a deal breaker - the fate of the Kyoto Protocol. Most developed countries are advocating a single integrated instrument at Copenhagen to replace the Kyoto Protocol. This article explores the anatomy of the G-77/China's resistance to such a new instrument, and argues that this instrument is likely, given emerging political realities, to take a fundamentally different character, and burdensharing arrangement, from that of the Kyoto Protocol.

Exploring Legal Form Options for a Post-2012 Climate Regime

In the run-up to the United Nations conference on climate change, scheduled to be held in Copenhagen, in December 2009 there is a great deal of discussion and speculation about what legal agreement should emerge from that conference. Given the current state of the negotiations, and the range of legal form options that countries are exploring, the most viable route for Copenhagen to adopt may be a transitional option that builds on the strengths of the Kyoto Protocol, provides a lead-in time for more ambitious engagement from key players, and eventually draws the Parties towards a simple, coherent, implementable and ambitious climate regime.

Democratisation of the United Nations

Democratisation of the United Nations Lavanya Rajamani As the UN completes its 50th year, its two principal organs the general assembly and the security council are the focus of reforms for reflecting changed equations in international relations.
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