ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Kamal MunirSubscribe to Kamal Munir

Inquilab in Pakistan

The political agitations led by Imran Khan and Tahir-ul-Qadri in Pakistan for the past few weeks had been billed as inquilab for a "Naya Pakistan". Even though they did not, and could not have lived up to their promise of revolutionary change, these two movements have unsettled the status quo of the elites and have politicised new sections of the population. This in itself may well have opened up some spaces which were unavailable earlier.

Pakistan's Post-Reforms Banking Sector

There is a common perception that the privatisation process turned a lethargic, moribund, non-performing Pakistani banking sector into a dynamic, modern and outward looking one, which is not only profi table and efficient but also contributing heavily to the country's growth. In this article the authors challenge this perception, showing how between 2000 and 2012 privatisation accompanied by highly indulgent regulatory policies in fact enabled the new owners to earn enormous profits at the expense of the country's economic development. The analysis raises serious questions for policymakers charged with safeguarding the public interest.

Pakistan Elections - I

Not since the 1970 elections have the people of Pakistan turned out in such great numbers to vote. Two differences are notable, however. First, while in 1970 they voted the Pakistan Peoples Party to power, this time they came out in droves to boot it out. And second, while 1970 was a time of great hope and optimism, this year their cynicism was palpable even as they voted. This was understandable as all the main contesting parties appeared committed irrevocably to the same market liberalism that has characterised Pakistan's governments for the last three decades. In the end, people followed the only path open to them in most democracies: vote the incumbent out, even if the alternatives promise more of the same!

Pakistan Election 2013: More Rejection, Less Election

Not since the 1970 election have the people of Pakistan turned out in such great numbers to vote. Two differences are notable, however. First, while in 1970 they voted the Pakistan People’s Party to power, this time, they came out in droves to boot it out. Second, while 1970 was a time of great hope and optimism, this year cynicism was palpable even as they voted. This was understandable as all the main contesting parties appeared committed irrevocably to the same market liberalism that has characterised Pakistan’s governments for the last three decades. In the end, people followed the only path open to them in most democracies: vote the incumbent out, even if the alternatives promise more of the same!

Pakistan's Power Politics

There is hardly any government meeting in Islamabad these days in which the debilitating energy crisis in which the country is engulfed is not discussed. Almost invariably, however, the problem is treated as one of governance - the government failing to meet its obligations to investors who are left with no choice but to stop producing electricity. This article shows how the actual problem lies in the privatisation policy under which the energy sector now operates.
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