ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Languishing Pulses

Languishing Pulses K T Achaya Pulse Production: Constraints and Opportunities (eds) H C Srivastava, S Bhaskaran, KKG Menon, S Ramanujam and M V Rao; Oxford and IBH Publishing Co, India, 1982; pp 439, Rs 175.

Operation Flood A Realistic View

Operation Flood: A Realistic View K T Achaya Vinod K Huria THE discussion note entitled 'Operation Flood; A Different View' by B S Baviskar and Shanti George (EPW, November 1-8) purports to be a discussion of the study entitled 'Rural Poverty and Operation Flood* by K T Achaya and Vinod K Huria (EPW, September 13). Baviskar and George begin by making a comparison between the recent study and an earlier one entitled 'Dairy Development in India: Some Critical Issues' published by the same authors (EPW, November 8, 1980) and claim that "Achaya and Huria seem to have considerably altered their stand in the period between the writing of the two articles". They hail the earlier article as a "sounder and a more balanced assessment' and the recent one as having a bias towards Operation Flood by saying "perhaps Achaya and Huria are insufficiently critical of the claims and arguments put forward by the authorities implementing Operation Flood".

Rural Poverty and Operation Flood

K T Achaya Vinod K Huria Operation Flood, as related to dairy development, is certainly not a panacea for poverty in India, but it will positively improve the economic conditions of 10 million rural families, over 70 per cent of whom will be landless and small farmers, out of an estimated 96 million.

Meeting Basic Needs Through Micro-Planning-Central Role of Essential Forestry

Central Role of Essential Forestry Vinod K Huria K T Achaya This paper argues that, while centralised planning has a great deal to its credit, some of the basic necessities of rural life, such as firewood, water' diet ary micro-nutrients, and better purchasing power, remain unfulfilled. An integrated conceptual approach to micro-planning and to essential forestry, to meet these needs, is therefore called for.

Meeting Basic Needs through Micro-Planning-Central Role of Essential Forestry

Meeting Basic Needs through Micro-Planning Central Role of Essential Forestry Vinod K Huria K T Achaya This paper argues that, while centralised planning has a great deal to its credit, some of the basic necessities of rural life, such as firewood, water, dietary micro-nutrients, and better purchasing power, remain unfulfilled. An integrated conceptual approach to micro-planning to meet these needs is, therefore, presented in this paper, Central to such planning is the concept of essential forestry, designed to furnish fuel, timber, fruits, fodder, and manure, and to serve as a pivotal point to open up ways of meeting other baste human requirements.

RDAs Their Limitations and Application

RDAs: Their Limitations and Application K T Achaya This paper illustrates the many types of problems encountered in uncovering data on which to base recommended daily allowances (RDAs). The latter, are, therefore, neither sacrosanct nor immutable but represent an informed judgement of current experimental data and everday experience.

We Are Eating Better

We Are Eating Better K T Achaya THE SIXTIES THERE is no lack of Indian dietary data for the decade 1960-70. National Sample Survey data are available, but ate mostly in terms of consumption expenditure on food items rather than as nutrient intakes, and further have been repeatedly questioned for accuracy, for example by Tyagi.1 The Diet Atlas of India (1971 revision), published by the National Institute of Nutrition, Hyderabad, 1' summarises data on intakes of calories and proteins in various states made during the prior decade by the State Nutrition Departments and published as their Nutrition Survey Reports, For calorics, the highest average per capita figure was for Punjab (2832), followed by Madhya Pradesh (2779), Uttar Pradesh (2-307), Maharashtra (2281), Jammu and Kashmir (2265), and Karnataka, then called Mysore (2220). The remaining 7 states listed (Rajas- than, Andhra Pradesh, West Bengal, Bihar, Kerala, Gujarat and Tamil Nadu) were low-intake regions, falling gradually in that order from 2044 to 1498 average calories. Protein figures followed calorie levels closely; the same top six .states varied in intakes from 98 to 66 grams a day, and the bottom six

Ailing Oilseeds

Ailing Oilseeds Oilseeds Economy of India: A Case Study of Groundnut by Uma Kapila; Agrioole Publishing Academy, D-76 Panchsheel Enclave, New Evaluation Report on Oilseeds Development Programme, Programme Evaluation Organisation, Planning Commission, Government of India, September 1981.

Dairy Development in India Some Critical Issues

Dairy Development in India: Some Critical Issues Vinod K Huria K T Achaya A great deal of progress has been made towards dairy development on sound lines, but certain basic questions would still bear emphasis. The chief of these is how the energy input-output ratio can be kept as favourable as possible in the absence of sufficient pastureland by which to reduce the cost of animal feeding. In turn this raises the question of whether grain and concentrate feeds will be available in sufficient quantity and at low enough cost to sustain the genetic potential of high-yielding animals, and whether this can be achieved through a total food system in which animals compete minimally with man for foods that both can consume. The answer to this may well set the limit to the degree of dairy development possible.

A Short View

A Short View Export projections are best shown in tabular form : K T Achaya THIS is one of a series of books engendered by the Tata Economic Consultancy Services concerning matters of economics, trade and development, in the dismal arena of oils and oilseeds, plagued by shortages and ever- rising prices, an attempt is made to project future demands, both domestic and export.

Profile of Indian Vegetable Oil Industry-II Movements of Oilseeds and Oils

II : Movements of Oilseeds and Oils S Chandrasekaran K T Achaya Production of specific types of oilseeds in India is strongly regional. Proportions of statewide production of seven oilseeds, and of their derived (Ms, are almost identical, showing that oilseeds are crushed mostly in the same states in which they are produced.

Profile of Indian Vegetable Oil Industry-I Production System

I: Production System S Chandrasekaran K T Achaya The vegetable oils industry in India is characterised by widely-scattered production units, and these are at alt levels of technology ranging from simple, traditional bullock-driven ghanis to sophisticated sol- vent-extraction plants.

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